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Former President Bill Clinton spoke at Rep. John Lewis' funeral on Thursday, recounting the congressman's civil rights legacy and describing him as a "walking rebuke" to those who wanted to give up in the fight for equal justice.

The big picture: Former Presidents Clinton, George W. Bush and Barack Obama are all speaking at Lewis' socially-distant service in Ebenezer Baptist Church, where Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. served as a co-pastor.

What he's saying: "John Lewis was a walking rebuke to people who thought, well, we ain't there yet and we have been working a long time. Isn't it time to bag it? He kept moving. He hoped for and imagined and lived and worked and moved for his beloved community. He took a savage beating on more than one day," Clinton said.

  • "No matter what, John always kept walking to reach the beloved community. He got into a lot of good trouble along the way, but let's not forget he also developed an absolutely uncanny ability to heal troubled waters."
  • "When he could have been angry and determined to cancel his adversaries, he tried to get converts instead. He thought that the open hand was better than the clenched fist."

The bottom line: "We got our last letter today on the pages of the New York Times," Clinton said, referencing a posthumous op-ed published Thursday. "Keep moving. It is so fitting on the day of his service he leaves us our marching orders. Keep moving."

Go deeper ... George W. Bush: "We live in a better and nobler country today because of John Lewis"

Go deeper

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
Feb 1, 2020 - Economy & Business

The future of moving

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Moving companies, a $25 billion business in the U.S., look like an upcoming target for disruption.

Why it matters: Technology has made dozens of tasks easier: We can use GPS for road trips instead of printing out directions, we can order our groceries online and get them delivered, and we can even meet our spouses on apps. But moving still sucks.

In photos: D.C. and U.S. states on alert for pre-inauguration violence

National Guard troops stand behind security fencing with the dome of the U.S. Capitol Building behind them, on Jan. 16. Photo: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Security has been stepped up in Washington, D.C., and state capitols across the U.S. as authorities brace for potential violence this weekend.

Driving the news: Following the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol by some supporters of President Trump, the FBI has said there could be armed protests in D.C. and in all 50 state capitols in the run-up to President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration Wednesday.

15 hours ago - Politics & Policy

The new Washington

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.