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Attorney General William Barr in the Oval Office on May 28. Photo: Doug Mills-Pool/Getty Images

The Justice Department and the FBI are investigating if police officers involved in the death of George Floyd violated federal civil rights laws, Attorney General Bill Barr said on Friday.

Driving the news: Barr's statement came shortly after charges of third-degree murder and manslaughter were announced against Derek Chauvin, the Minneapolis officer who was seen kneeling on Floyd's neck on Monday. Floyd died after being taken to a hospital following the encounter.

What he's saying: “The video images of the incident that ended with death of Mr. Floyd, while in custody of Minneapolis police officers, were harrowing to watch and deeply disturbing. The state prosecutor has been in the process of determining whether any criminal charges are appropriate under state law," Barr said in a statement.

  • "...This process is proceeding quickly. As is the typical practice, the state’s charging decisions will be made first. I am confident justice will be served," he said.

Go deeper: FBI to investigate death of black man after video shows officer kneeling on neck

Go deeper

Bill Barr praises killing of self-proclaimed antifa member

Bill Barr in the White House in August. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Attorney General Bill Barr in a statement Friday praised law enforcement for tracking and killing Michael Forest Reinoehl, a self-described antifa member suspected of killing a right-wing activist who was part of a pro-Trump caravan in Portland, Oregon, on Aug. 29.

Why it matters: Barr claimed that the "streets of our cities are safer" after Reinoehl's death, and that the event is an "unmistakable demonstration that the United States will be governed by law, not violent mobs."

The social media addiction bubble

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Right now, everyone from Senate leaders to the makers of Netflix's popular "Social Dilemma" is promoting the idea that Facebook is addictive.

Yes, but: Human beings have raised fears about the addictive nature of every new media technology since the 18th century brought us the novel, yet the species has always seemed to recover its balance once the initial infatuation wears off.

Young people's next big COVID test

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Young, healthy people will be at the back of the line for coronavirus vaccines, and they'll have to maintain their sense of urgency as they wait their turn — otherwise, vaccinations won't be as effective in bringing the pandemic to a close.

The big picture: "It’s great young people are anticipating the vaccine," said Jewel Mullen, associate dean for health equity at the University of Texas. But the prospect of that enthusiasm waning is "a cause for concern," she said.