Mar 1, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Biden on lack of Obama endorsement: "I have to earn this on my own"

Joe Biden said on ABC's "This Week" Sunday that he doesn't believe President Obama's lack of endorsement hurt his campaign, adding: "I don't think it is time. He and I talked about this from the very beginning. I have to earn this on my own."

Why it matters: Some pundits have speculated that the days after Biden's landslide South Carolina victory would be the perfect opportunity for Obama to endorse, giving his vice president a much-needed boost ahead of Super Tuesday.

  • If Obama truly believes that Sen. Bernie Sanders would divide the party and could lose to President Trump, as has been reported, that would make a Biden endorsement even more urgent — considering that Sanders is threatening to run away with an insurmountable delegate lead after Tuesday's contests.

What he's saying:

"Remember, the first thing everybody said when I announced — the Democratic opposition, said, 'Well, Biden feels entitled because he's vice president.' Imagine had the president endorsed me. It would have been, 'Well, Biden thinks he's entitled because the president endorsed him.' The president and I are close friends. And I have no doubt that when I win this nomination that he will be out there full bore for me."
— Joe Biden on ABC's "This Week"

Go deeper: Super Tuesday suddenly looks different

Go deeper

Super Tuesday suddenly looks different

Biden celebrates in South Carolina. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Joe Biden's huge win in South Carolina is resetting the parameters of the Democratic contest ahead of Super Tuesday.

Why it matters: The former vice president's first primary victory raises existential questions for billionaire Mike Bloomberg and could slow Bernie Sanders' runaway train. And it could give new life to Biden's own withering electability argument — and ramp up pressure on moderates in his lane to drop out.

Joe Biden: Pete Buttigieg reminds me of my son Beau

Pete Buttigieg and Joe Biden at the first Democratic presidential debate in Miami last year. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Former Vice President Joe Biden said that the 38-year-old Pete Buttigieg was reminiscent of his late son, Beau Biden, because he also "has a backbone ... like a ramrod," after Biden's former Democratic presidential rival endorsed him for president Monday.

The big picture: Biden's campaign has been gaining momentum since he won the South Carolina Democratic primary. Former 2020 candidates Amy Klobuchar, who dropped out of the race earlier in the day, and Beto O'Rourke, who suspended his campaign last November, also endorsed him at a rally in Dallas on Monday.

Go deeper: Joe Biden's sudden, shocking surge

Editor's note: This article has been updated to reflect O'Rourke's endorsement of Biden.

Sanders assesses path forward after more big Biden wins

Joe Biden speaks in Philadelphia after more crucial wins against Bernie Sanders. Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

The big question for Bernie Sanders after Tuesday night's losses: Is there a path back to the Democratic nomination, or is Joe Biden's trajectory unstoppable?

The state of play: Notably, Sanders did not comment on the results. Pressure ramped up on him to concede and Biden carefully began to turn his remarks to the general election after extending his delegate lead in "Super Tuesday 2," with wins in Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri and Idaho.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Mar 11, 2020 - Politics & Policy