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President Joe Biden. Photo: Al Drago-Pool/Getty Images

President Biden has nominated Monica Medina to become assistant secretary at the State Department's Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs, the White House announced Thursday.

Why it matters: Medina, the wife of White House Chief of Staff Ron Klain, previously worked at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The big picture: Medina is currently an adjunct professor at Georgetown University and one of the founders of Our Daily Planet, an "e-newsletter on conservation and the environment," per the White House.

  • She worked at NOAA during the Clinton and Obama administrations and was reportedly considered a contender for a leadership position there, per the Washington Post.
  • Medina has previously advocated for the creation of a National Climate Service.

What they're saying: “Monica is a national and international leader on environmental issues with extensive experience in government, law, policy and conservation," said Eric Schwaab, senior vice president of the ecosystems and oceans program at the Environmental Defense Fund.

  • "I had the privilege to work alongside Monica while at NOAA in the Obama administration. Monica’s experience and passion for people and the planet will serve the United States and the Biden administration well at this critical time."

Go deeper: White House nominates Rick Spinrad as NOAA leader

Go deeper

White House nominates Rick Spinrad as NOAA leader

In this NOAA GOES-East satellite handout image, Hurricane Dorian, a Cat. 4 storm, moves slowly past Grand Bahama Island on September 2, 2019. (Photo by NOAA via Getty Images)

The White House on Thursday evening nominated Rick Spinrad, an oceanographer at Oregon State University, to head the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Why it matters: Filling the NOAA slot would complete the Biden administration's leadership on the climate and environment team. The agency, located within the Commerce Department, houses the National Weather Service and conducts much of the nation's climate science research.

Robinhood IPO brings meme stock icon into the Wall Street fold

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Today is the day everyone can begin buying and selling shares in Robinhood, which goes public on the New York Stock Exchange after raising $1.89 billion in its IPO.

Why it matters: Robinhood is considered a proxy for the rise of retail investing, particularly among younger Americans. But it also has drawn regulatory and political scrutiny for a variety of business practices, and found itself in the crosshairs after users drove up the price of GameStop stock earlier this year.

Study: Cost of carbon emissions measured in lives lost is high

Data: Our World in Data; Chart: Axios Visuals

Adding projected heat-related deaths into cost-benefit analysis of federal rules would tilt policymaking in favor of more aggressive carbon emissions cuts, a new study finds.

Why it matters: The social cost of carbon helps determine the outcome of cost-benefit analyses that underpin federal regulations. Adding in global warming's potential to cause more heat-related fatalities would tilt the policy calculus from supporting a gradual phaseout of emissions starting in 2050, to fully decarbonizing by the same year.