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Data: Data for Progress; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

Joe Biden's climate posture is a political winner in four states where Senate races and the presidential contest are competitive, per new polling from progressive think tank Data for Progress.

Why it matters: Biden has tethered the spending portion of his energy and climate platform to his wider economic response to the coronavirus pandemic, which could mean a quick push for legislative action if he wins.

  • And if Biden wins in November, the Senate makeup will affect how much of his agenda is implemented (as least when it comes to parts that require Congress).

By the numbers: It shows support for environmental justice proposals. In North Carolina, for instance, 52% are more likely to vote for a Senate candidate backing the idea of steering 40% of climate investments to low-income communities, while just a quarter of respondents would be less likely.

  • There's also backing for achieving 100% carbon-free power by 2035 (which is part of Biden's platform). Fifty percent support the idea, while 35% back the alternative offered of using "coal, oil and natural gas as well as clean energy sources based on what is cheapest."

My thought bubble: Some of the poll's question framing is favorable to aggressive climate policies and spending.

Of note: The overall survey has a margin of error of plus-or-minus 2.2%, but it's higher for certain questions and sub-groupings.

Go deeper

Ben Geman, author of Generate
Updated Nov 13, 2020 - Energy & Environment

Workers want their bosses to do better on climate

Data: KPMG; Table: Axios Visuals

Corporate climate performance plays a role in how workers think about their employers, not to mention talent recruitment and loss, per a survey from KPMG and the law firm Eversheds Sutherlands.

Why it matters: The outlook from directors and top executives from hundreds of companies provides some interesting data points on how the corporate world is and isn't addressing climate change.

Scoop: Trump tells confidants he plans to pardon Michael Flynn

Photo: Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

President Trump has told confidants he plans to pardon his former national security adviser Michael Flynn, who pleaded guilty in December 2017 to lying to the FBI about his Russian contacts, two sources with direct knowledge of the discussions tell Axios.

Behind the scenes: Sources with direct knowledge of the discussions said Flynn will be part of a series of pardons that Trump issues between now and when he leaves office.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
4 hours ago - World

Remote work shakes up geopolitics

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The global adoption of remote work may leave the rising powers in the East behind.

The big picture: Despite India's and China's economic might, these countries have far fewer remote jobs than the U.S. or Europe. That's affecting the emerging economies' resilience amid the pandemic.