Photo: Leigh Vogel/Getty Images

Former Vice President Joe Biden on Wednesday addressed the grand jury decision not to charge the officers for the killing of Breonna Taylor, saying in a statement that the decision "does not answer" the call for equal justice.

The big picture: Biden called for reforms to address police use of force and no-knock warrants, while demanding a ban on chokeholds. He added that people "have a right to peacefully protest, but violence is never acceptable."

  • "[W]e can express pain, grief, anger and disappointment at the way things are, but remain focused on rebuilding trust in our communities and delivering change that can be."

What he's saying: "In the wake of her tragic death, we mourn with her mother, family, and community and ask ourselves whether justice could be equally applied in America," Biden wrote.

  • "I know for so many people today’s decision does not answer that call. A federal investigation remains ongoing, but we do not need to wait for the final judgment of that investigation to do more to deliver justice for Breonna."
  • "We must continue to speak Breonna Taylor’s name, support her family still in grieving, and never give up on ensuring the full promise of America for every American."

The other side: President Trump welcomed Wednesday's decision, calling it "really brilliant."

  • "Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron is doing a fantastic job, I think he's a star," Trump said.

Go deeper

Judge drops third-degree murder charge against Derek Chauvin in George Floyd death

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. Photo: Hennepin County Sheriff's Office

A Minnesota judge on Thursday dropped the third-degree murder charge against former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd, but kept the higher charge, KARE 11 reports.

Driving the news: Hennepin County District Judge Peter Cahill wrote that he was dropping the third-degree murder charge because Chauvin's actions did not put others in danger. Chauvin, who knelt on Floyd's neck for several minutes as the Black man cried out, "I can't breathe," still faces the higher second-degree murder charge, as well as a second-degree manslaughter charge.

Amy Harder, author of Generate
5 hours ago - Energy & Environment

Climate change goes mainstream in presidential debate

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty

The most notable part of Thursday’s presidential debate on climate change was the fact it was included as a topic and assumed as a fact.

The big picture: This is the first time in U.S. presidential history that climate change was a featured issue at a debate. It signals how the problem has become part of the fabric of our society. More extreme weather, like the wildfires ravaging Colorado, is pushing the topic to the front-burner.

Finally, a real debate

Photo: Morry Gash/AP

A more disciplined President Trump held back from the rowdy interruptions at tonight's debate in Nashville, while making some assertions so outlandish that Joe Biden chuckled and even closed his eyes. A Trump campaign adviser told Axios: "He finally listened." 

The result: A real debate.