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President Biden in Pittsburgh / Photo by Jim Watson / AFP

White House senior adviser Anita Dunn is making the case that Democrats can't lose by rallying around President Biden's infrastructure plan because its individual components poll even higher than the $1.9 trillion COVID stimulus passed last month.

Driving the news: "Key components of President Biden’s American Jobs Plan are overwhelmingly popular — among a bipartisan and broad coalition," Dunn wrote in a memo to "interested parties" obtained by Axios around Biden's rollout of the first of two infrastructure spending packages.

Why it matters: With a price tag of between $2.2 trillion and $2.7 trillion depending on how it's calculated, it already has come under fire from Republican lawmakers and faces resistance from some moderate Democrats.

  • But Dunn's memo suggests that, rather than worry, Democrats can lean into the popularity of the individual components of the plan to pressure House and Senate Republicans to come around — and bash them to voters if they don't.

By the numbers: Dunn cites public polling showing between 74% and 87% support among Americans for seven elements: new job training for coal miners, highway and bridge work, increasing affordable childcare, expanding broadband access, expanding family and medical leave, upgrading public transportation, and investing in clean energy.

  • The individual elements garner higher bipartisan support than when Americans are simply asked if they support a new infrastructure bill.

Go deeper

Updated Mar 31, 2021 - Politics & Policy

Biden unveils sweeping American Jobs Plan

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Biden will ask Congress Wednesday to spend $2 trillion on an infrastructure plan over eight years, and pay for it by increasing taxes on corporations for nearly twice as long.

Driving the news: The package, which he will unveil during a speech in Pittsburgh, seeks to fulfill a range of promises he made on the campaign trail to fix the country’s crumbling infrastructure, slow the growing climate crisis and reduce economic inequality.

Ben Geman, author of Generate
Mar 31, 2021 - Economy & Business

Biden's clean energy infrastructure plan draws interest of lobbyists

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

President Biden's attempt to steer huge energy infrastructure plans through Congress and his wide-ranging executive agenda are together creating intense lobbying and advocacy efforts to shape the policies.

Why it matters: The new proposal for an energy infrastructure package is vastly larger than the roughly $90 billion for clean energy in the 2009 stimulus, and the constellation of interests in play is huge.

Groups call for paid leave in infrastructure bill

Photo: Stefani Reynolds/CNP/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Over 400 organizations are calling on President Biden to include paid family leave in the sprawling infrastructure package he'll begin to unveil this week.

Why it matters: The paid-leave provisions for coronavirus patients and caregivers enacted during the pandemic expired last year, and advocacy groups and members of Congress want to make similar federal allowances permanent.