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Joe Biden delivering a speech in Delaware in July. Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

Joe Biden explained on Twitter Thursday night what he "meant" by earlier comments suggesting that "the African American community is a monolith."

What they're saying: "Unlike the African American community, with notable exceptions, the Latino community is an incredibly diverse community with incredibly different attitudes about different things," Biden remarked in an interview hosted by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and the National Association for Black Journalists, Politico reports.

  • "You go to Florida, and you find a very different attitude about immigration in certain places than you do when you're in Arizona," the former vice president continued.

President Trump responded to the comments outside the White House on Thursday, saying that, "Joe Biden, this morning, totally disparaged and insulted the Black community. What he said is incredible."

Biden, on Thursday evening, wrote on Twitter: "Earlier today, I made some comments about diversity in the African American and Latino communities that I want to clarify. In no way did I mean to suggest the African American community is a monolith — not by identity, not on issues, not at all."

  • "Throughout my career I've witnessed the diversity of thought, background, and sentiment within the African American community. It's this diversity that makes our workplaces, communities, and country a better place."
  • "My commitment to you is this: I will always listen, I will never stop fighting for the African American community and I will never stop fighting for a more equitable future."

The big picture: In May, Biden apologized for saying "you ain't Black" if "you have a problem figuring out whether you're for me or [President] Trump" during an interview on the radio show "The Breakfast Club."

Go deeper

Scoop: Rep. Tony Cárdenas is running for chair of House Democrats' campaign arm

Photo: Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Rep. Tony Cárdenas (D-Calif.) is running for chair of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC), as Democrats look for new leadership after failing to expand their House majority in last week's election, according to a source familiar.

Why it matters: Cardenas' consideration for this leadership post reflects a recognition among Democrats that they need to shore up their support with Hispanic voters and better understand the nuances of the Latino community to improve their electoral prospects.

Off the Rails

Episode 2: Barbarians at the Oval

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. This Axios series takes you inside the collapse of a president.

Episode 2: Trump stops buying what his professional staff are telling him, and increasingly turns to radical voices telling him what he wants to hear.

President Trump plunked down in an armchair in the White House residence, still dressed from his golf game — navy fleece, black pants, white MAGA cap. It was Saturday, Nov. 7. The networks had just called the election for Joe Biden.

Fringe right plots new attacks out of sight

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Domestic extremists are using obscure and private corners of the internet to plot new attacks ahead of Inauguration Day. Their plans are also hidden in plain sight, buried in podcasts and online video platforms.

Why it matters: Because law enforcement was caught flat-footed during last week's Capitol siege, researchers and intelligence agencies are paying more attention to online threats that could turn into real-world violence.