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Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos proposed a tax credit last month for people and businesses who donate money for children to attend private schools, a move that has stirred up the school choice debate among politicians and education analysts.

The big picture: Despite the encouragement for more growth through scholarships, New York City charter schools, which are funded by local taxes, grants and donations, reached their cap last week. If the state doesn’t lift the cap, charter growth will most likely end. Resources have begun to drain while enrollment for charter schools across the country has grown exponentially, causing teachers from charter schools to walk out this year for the first time ever.

What they're saying:

  • Andy Rotherham, founder of nonprofit consulting firm Bellwether Education Partners, told Axios: "The Trump administration has had its chances to put forth initiatives of school choice that could force some hard conversations, and it’s highly unlikely the tax incentive introduced was the one. ... The administration doesn’t seem to be able to stay on message about anything for very long. Democrats control the House. It’s hard to see them bringing this up for a vote."
  • House Education Committee chairman Rep. Bobby Scott (D-Va.) said on NPR: "If you’re going to spend money in education, there are better ways of spending it than a scholarship program that’s totally undefined. You have to consider any proposal that’s made, but I think it's fair to say I’m skeptical."
  • American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten said at an Axios event: "You cannot think that you can privatize or outsource this. You have this huge available asset called public education that really wants to align with business and industry both in terms of K-12 and in terms of community colleges."
  • Jim Blew, the Education Department's assistant secretary for policy and development, said on NPR: "Because it is a tax credit, the Fed doesn’t need to get involved with new mandates, new regulations. The voluntary component makes sure money is not diverted from public schools and teachers."

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Dave Lawler, author of World
1 hour ago - World

Global press freedom deteriorates amid pandemic

Data: Reporters Without Borders; Chart: Axios Visuals

Journalism is seriously restricted in 132 of 180 countries included in Reporters without Borders' annual Press Freedom Index — a particularly dangerous state of affairs during the pandemic.

Breaking it down: Nordic countries are ranked high on the list for having "good" press freedoms, while China, Turkmenistan, North Korea and Eritrea are at the bottom. The U.S. is ranked 44th.

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
2 hours ago - Economy & Business

How anti-greed backlash killed the European Super League

Photo: David Cliff/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The 48-hour rise and fall of the European Super League is the perfect encapsulation of how anti-greed sentiment has changed the rules of capitalism.

Why it matters: The highly-complex structures of capitalism are built from the mostly base motivations of individuals chasing money. That's been condemned and celebrated in equal measure — but has also largely been accepted.

2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Senate Republicans unveil $568 billion infrastructure counterproposal

Sens. John Barasso and Shelley Moore Capito. Photo: Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Senate Republicans formally rolled out the framework for their $568 billion counterproposal to President Biden's $2.5 trillion infrastructure plan on Thursday.

Why it matters: The package is far narrower than anything congressional Democrats or the White House would agree to, but it serves as a marker for what Republicans want out of a potential bipartisan deal.