Photo: Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call

Bernie Sanders will not endorse his son, Levi, in his New Hampshire congressional race, stating that his family "[does] not believe in dynastic politics." The Vermont senator stated that Levi is "running his own campaign in his own way, "adding that he is "very proud" of his son's accomplishments.

Yes, but: There are rumblings in New Hampshire that Levi's campaign is widely seen as inept and likely to lose, per The Boston Globe. As a result, New Hampshire politics aficionados believe Bernie may not want to harm his brand before the 2020 presidential campaign by throwing his full weight behind his son.

Bernie's full statement:

"Levi is running for Congress on the most important issues facing working families. He is fighting for raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour, Medicare for All, demanding the wealthy and large corporations pay their fair share of taxes, creating millions of good jobs by rebuilding our crumbling infrastructure, addressing the crisis of climate change, making public college and universities tuition free, criminal justice reform and immigration reform — among many other issues.
Levi has spent his life in public service to low income and working families, and I am very proud of all that he has done. In our family, however, we do not believe in dynastic politics. Levi is running his own campaign in his own way."

Go deeper

Ben Geman, author of Generate
30 mins ago - Energy & Environment

U.S. cities' lagging climate progress

Expand chart
Reproduced from a Brookings Institution report; Chart: Axios Visuals

A just-published Brookings Institution analysis of U.S. cities' pledges to cut carbon emissions reveals very mixed results.

Why it matters: The potential — and limits — of city and state initiatives have gotten more attention amid President Trump's scuttling of Obama-era national policies.

New state unemployment filings fall to 787,000

Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

First-time applications for unemployment fell last week, according to Department of Labor data released on Thursday.

Between the lines: The overall number of Americans relying on unemployment also fell to a still-staggering 23 million. But there are continued signs of labor market strain, with more people shifting to an unemployment program designed for the long-term jobless.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: Chris Christie: Wear a mask "or you may regret it — as I did" — Senate Democrats block vote on McConnell's targeted relief bill.
  2. Business: New state unemployment filings fall.
  3. Economy: Why the stimulus delay isn't a crisis (yet).
  4. Health: Many U.S. deaths were avoidable — The pandemic is getting worse again.
  5. Education: Boston and Chicago send students back home for online learning.
  6. World: Spain and France exceed 1 million cases.