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Photo: Patrick Semansky-Pool/Getty Image

Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.) said in an interview on CBS "This Morning" that he would "definitely consider" any articles of impeachment against President Trump if the House decides to move forward with that process.

Why it matters: It signals that Republican senators, including those like Sasse who voted against convicting Trump in last year's impeachment trial, may now be open to the possibility of removing the president as a result of his conduct surrounding the Capitol insurrection.

What they're saying: "The House, if they come together and have a process, I will definitely consider whatever articles they might move because, as I've told you, I believe the president has disregarded his oath of office," Sasse said.

  • "He swore an oath to the American people to preserve, protect and defend the constitution. He acted against that, what he did was wicked," he continued.

The big picture: House Democrats are holding a caucus call Friday at noon to discuss the possibility of impeaching Trump for a second time if Vice President Pence and Trump’s Cabinet do not invoke the 25th Amendment.

  • Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) shared a screenshot of articles of impeachment that she said had "already been drafted" by Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) and "are ready for introduction."
  • House Assistant Speaker Catherine Clark (D-Mass.) told CNN on Friday that articles of impeachment could be brought to the House floor as soon as "mid-next week."

Go deeper

Kudlow says he's "very disappointed" in Trump's treatment of Pence

Larry Kudlow. Photo: Alex Wong via Getty

White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow criticized President Trump’s response to last week's U.S. Capitol siege and his treatment of Vice President Mike Pence in the aftermath of the 2020 election, in an interview with The Wall Street Journal on Friday.

The big picture: Trump has lost support from a number of top aides and allies since a mob of his supporters stormed the Capitol building on Jan. 6, resulting in five deaths. Kudlow is the latest to publicly speak out against the president.

Scoop: Comms director for gun-toting congresswoman quits

Rep. Lauren Boebert during the Electoral College debate. Photo: Congress.gov via Getty Images

The communications director for Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado, a firebrand Republican freshman who boasts about carrying a gun to work, has quit after less than two weeks on the job.

Why it matters: Ben Goldey’s resignation cited last week's insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, which came amid efforts by Boebert and other Republican lawmakers to block certification of President-elect Joe Biden’s Electoral College victory. Her rhetoric on the issue mirrored President Trump's, which has fueled baseless election conspiracy theories and resulting violence.

Off the Rails

Episode 1: A premeditated lie lit the fire

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. This Axios series takes you inside the collapse of a president.

Episode 1: Trump’s refusal to believe the election results was premeditated. He had heard about the “red mirage” — the likelihood that early vote counts would tip more Republican than the final tallies — and he decided to exploit it.

"Jared, you call the Murdochs! Jason, you call Sammon and Hemmer!”