Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Loan growth at U.S. banks declined in the third quarter, as banks tightened lending standards and demand from businesses fell.

Why it matters: It's the latest piece of evidence showing that the Fed's programs are helping prop up Wall Street but aren't trickling down to help most everyday Americans.

  • Banks cited the poor economic outlook and a reduced risk tolerance for their decisions to further tighten loan standards. Some banks also pointed to less aggressive competition from other lenders.

Driving the news: Gross loans at the 15 largest U.S. banks, excluding Paycheck Protection Program loans, fell 1% quarter over quarter in Q3, and overall lending saw a 0.9% decline, S&P Global announced Monday.

  • Commercial and industrial loans fell as 14 of the 15 largest U.S. banks reported a decrease.

The big picture: The news followed the Fed's latest survey of senior loan officers on Nov. 9 that showed banks continued to tighten standards for lending despite the Fed's QE4ever program and hundreds of billions of dollars in financing via its special purpose vehicles.

  • For consumers, banks are requiring higher minimum credit scores for credit cards and auto loans.
  • Small businesses are seeing higher collateralization requirements and higher premiums on loans as well as the use of interest rate floors, the survey found.

Go deeper

ServiceNow launches $100M racial equity fund

Photo: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

ServiceNow will create a $100 million racial equity fund that aims to promote more lending within Black communities.

Why it matters: It’s the latest move by corporate America to dedicate resources to fighting systemic racism and inequality.

Stark reminder for America's corporate leaders

Rosalind "Roz" Brewer is about to become only the second Black woman to permanently lead a Fortune 500 company. She starts as Walgreens CEO on March 15.

Why it matters: It's a stark reminder of how far corporate America's top decision-makers have to go during an unprecedented push by politicians, employees and even a stock exchange to diversify their top ranks.

Ina Fried, author of Login
Updated 53 mins ago - Technology

Apple's quarterly sales top $100 billion for first time

Credit: Apple

Spurred by strong sales of the latest iPhones, Apple reported it took in a record $111 billion in revenue for the three months ended Dec. 31, as the company crushed expectations.

Why it matters: The move showed even a pandemic didn't dull demand for Apple's latest smartphones.