Feb 20, 2018

How banks could control gun sales if D.C. won’t

Students and supporters protest against gun violence outside of the White House after the Parkland shooting. Photo: Bill Clark / CQ Roll Call

A big idea for the gun control debate, leveraging banks — DealBook column by N.Y. Times' Andrew Ross Sorkin: "What if the finance industry — credit card companies ... credit card processors ... and banks ... were to effectively set new rules for the sales of guns in America?"

Why it matters: "Collectively, they have more leverage over the gun industry than any lawmaker. And it wouldn’t be hard for them to take a stand."

  • The backdrop: "For the past year, chief executives have often talked about the new sense of moral responsibility that corporations have to help their communities and confront social challenges even when Washington won’t."
  • The companies could change their "terms of service to say that it won’t do business with retailers that sell assault weapons, high-capacity magazines and bump stocks."
  • What's next: "I spent the last 72 hours calling and emailing a handful of chief executives to discuss these ideas. ... [S]ome said they had already been thinking about it. A few ... called their peers to begin a conversation."

N.Y. Times Quote of the Day, from "Educators Face Daunting Role: Student Shield," on the front page:

  • Robert Parish, a teacher at a Florida elementary school near Stoneman Douglas High: “Last night I told my wife I would take a bullet for the kids.”

Happening today ... "A hundred Stoneman Douglas High School students are busing 400 miles to Florida's capital [Tallahassee] to urge lawmakers to act to prevent a repeat of the massacre that killed" 14 students and three faculty. (AP)

Go deeper

Updated 14 mins ago - World

In photos: People around the world rally against racism

Despite a ban on large gatherings implemented in response to the coronavirus pandemic, protesters rally against racism in front of the American Embassy in Paris on June 6. Photo: Julien Mattia/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Tens of thousands of people have continued to rally in cities across the world against racism and show their support this week for U.S. demonstrators protesting the death in police custody of George Floyd.

Why it matters: The tense situation in the U.S. has brought the discussion of racism and discrimination onto the global stage at a time when most of the world is consumed by the novel coronavirus.

George Floyd updates

Protesters in Washington, D.C. on June 6. Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Thousands of demonstrators are gathering in cities across the U.S. and around the world to protest the killing of George Floyd. Huge crowds have assembled in Washington, D.C., Philadelphia and Chicago for full-day events.

Why it matters: Twelve days of nationwide protest in the U.S. has built pressure for states to make new changes on what kind of force law enforcement can use on civilians and prompted officials to review police conduct.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7:30 p.m. ET: 6,852,810 — Total deaths: 398,211 — Total recoveries — 3,071,142Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7:30 p.m. ET: 1,917,080 — Total deaths: 109,702 — Total recoveries: 500,849 — Total tested: 19,778,873Map.
  3. Public health: Why the pandemic is hitting minorities harder — Coronavirus curve rises in FloridaHow racism threatens the response to the pandemic Some people are drinking and inhaling cleaning products in attempt to fight the virus.
  4. Tech: The pandemic is accelerating next-generation disease diagnostics — Robotics looks to copy software-as-a-service model.
  5. Business: Budgets busted by coronavirus make it harder for cities to address inequality Sports, film production in California to resume June 12 after 3-month hiatus.
  6. Education: Students and teachers flunked remote learning.