Some of the country’s largest school districts have already made the decision to go online-only for this coming school year. Many are talking about hybrid models that combine distance and in-person learning, but whether they're online or in the classroom, teachers will bear the brunt of making their classes work.

  • Plus, why Joe Biden’s campaign is dreading foreign policy.
  • And a little joy for your Friday, a pandemic parody

Guests: Axios' Kim Hart and Hans Nichols, Austin school teacher Rachel Seney, and National Education Association president Lily Eskelsen García.

Credits: "Axios Today" is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Carol Alderman, Cara Shillenn, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Naomi Shavin and Alex Sugiura. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Jul 24, 2020 - Podcasts

Busting the racial wealth gap myths

Ideas about the racial wealth gap in America have been around for a long time. The divide is growing even wider, despite education and income — but, most importantly, the proposed causes and solutions start to fall apart when you look at the details.

Jul 28, 2020 - Podcasts

The second wave of protests

Thousands of people held protests in at least a dozen American cities this weekend, days after the Trump administration announced it would send more federal agents to Chicago and Albuquerque in an extension of Operation Legend. A month ago protests over the killing of George Floyd had begun to dwindle — now, they’re back.

GOP plans "nightly surprise" for revamped convention

President Trump at the 2016 Republican National Convention. Photo: Bill Clark/Getty Images

The reworked Republican National Convention will be a four-night spectacle including still-under-wraps venues, a 10 p.m. "nightly surprise" and guests and themes playing to "the forgotten men and women of America," two senior Trump campaign officials involved tell Axios.

Driving the news: The messaging will focus heavily on "very granular details" of what a second term for President Trump would look like — answering a question Trump left hanging in a Fox News event earlier this summer — and attack cancel culture, "radical elements" of society and threats to public safety.