Coronavirus cases are on the rise in 33 states — and California and Florida hit record high numbers of daily cases last week. Hospitals and other medical facilities are feeling déjà vu, as they start to experience personal protective equipment shortages again.

  • Plus, Roger Stone talks to Axios' Mike Allen 48 hours after President Trump commuted his sentence.
  • And the massive rise of alternative meat sales means a fundamental change for the American diet.

Guests: Axios' Bob Herman, Mike Allen and Bryan Walsh.

Credits: "Axios Today" is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Carol Alderman, Cara Shillenn, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Naomi Shavin and Alex Sugiura. Music is composed by Evan Viola. We can be contacted by email at podcasts@axios.com.

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Aug 13, 2020 - Podcasts

The financial toll of the pandemic

Expanded unemployment benefits have expired and the stimulus checks have dried up. Now, a growing number of American families are struggling to stay afloat. Without more government aid, their dire financial situations will get worse.

Apple's antitrust fight turns Epic

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Millions of angry gamers may soon join the chorus of voices calling for an antitrust crackdown on Apple, as the iPhone giant faces a new lawsuit and PR blitz from Epic Games, maker of mega-hit Fortnite.

Why it matters: Apple is one of several Big Tech firms accused of violating the spirit, if not the letter, of antitrust law. A high-profile lawsuit could become a roadmap for either building a case against tech titans under existing antitrust laws or writing new ones better suited to the digital economy.

Survey: Fears grow about Social Security’s future

Data: AARP survey of 1,441 U.S. adults conducted July 14–27, 2020 a ±3.4% margin of error at the 95% confidence level; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

Younger Americans are increasingly concerned that Social Security won't be enough to wholly fall back on once they retire, according to a survey conducted by AARP — in honor of today's 85th anniversary of the program — given first to Axios.

Why it matters: Young people's concerns about financial insecurity once they're on a restricted income are rising — and that generation is worried the program, which currently pays out to 65 million beneficiaries, won't be enough to sustain them.