This week, Facebook failed its own civil rights audit. The internal audit showed the social media company still hasn’t done enough to protect users from hate speech or crack down on fake information used to suppress voter turnout on its platform.

  • Plus, the Trump administration wants schools to reopen in the fall, but school and local officials don't have clear guidance about how to make it safe or feasible.
  • And, TikTok has become a tempting target for the Trump administration's fight against China.

Guests: Axios' Ina Fried, Caitlin Owens, and Mike Allen.

Credits: "Axios Today" is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Carol Alderman, Cara Shillenn, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Naomi Shavin and Alex Sugiura. Music is composed by Evan Viola. We can be contacted by email at podcasts@axios.com.

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Hong Kong's political freedom ends

It’s been about a month since the Chinese Communist Party forced a national security law on Hong Kong. This new law made it illegal for anyone anywhere in the world to promote democratic reform in the region. Recent arrests of top media and political figures have made it clear that Hong Kong's relatively free political system is over.

Tech's reluctant road to taking on Trump

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The coronavirus pandemic, Black Lives Matter protests and a looming election have brought long-simmering conflicts between tech platforms and President Trump to a boil, as Facebook, Twitter and other services are starting to take presidential misinformation seriously.

What's happening: Wary of becoming arbiters of political speech, tech's platforms have carved out a range of exceptions and immunities for Trump and other political leaders — but that accommodation is coming undone.

Joe Biden picks Kamala Harris as running mate

Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images

Joe Biden announced Tuesday that he has chosen Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) as his running mate — the first Black woman to be named to a major-party U.S. presidential ticket, and potentially the first woman vice president if Biden defeats President Trump.

The big picture: Harris was probably the safest choice Biden could have made among his running mate finalists. She has a national profile and experience with elected office, was vetted and tested in the Democratic presidential primaries and can boost Biden's fundraising.