Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on the day's biggest business stories

Subscribe to Axios Closer for insights into the day’s business news and trends and why they matter

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sign up for Axios Pro Rata

Dive into the world of dealmakers across VC, PE and M&A with Axios Pro Rata. Delivered daily to your inbox by Dan Primack and Kia Kokalitcheva.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sports news worthy of your time

Binge on the stats and stories that drive the sports world with Axios Sports. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tech news worthy of your time

Get our smart take on technology from the Valley and D.C. with Axios Login. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Get the inside stories

Get an insider's guide to the new White House with Axios Sneak Peek. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Denver news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Des Moines news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Twin Cities news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Tampa Bay news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Charlotte news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Nashville news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with the Axios Nashville newsletter.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Columbus news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with the Axios Columbus newsletter.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Dallas news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with the Axios Dallas newsletter.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Austin news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with the Axios Austin newsletter.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Atlanta news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with the Axios Atlanta newsletter.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Philadelphia news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with the Axios Philadelphia newsletter.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Chicago news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with the Axios Chicago newsletter.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sign up for Axios NW Arkansas

Stay up-to-date on the most important and interesting stories affecting NW Arkansas, authored by local reporters

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top DC news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with the Axios DC newsletter.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

The rollout for the Pfizer COVID vaccine for kids ages 5 through 11 could begin as early as next week. We answer some of your questions.

  • Plus, high stakes for the new Biden social spending framework.
  • And, oil and gas executives face a grilling on the Hill.

Guests: Axios' Tina Reed, Hans Nichols, and Andrew Freedman.

Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Dan Bobkoff, Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Alex Sugiura, Sabeena Singhani, Lydia McMullen-Laird, Michael Hanf, and David Toledo. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. You can text questions, comments and story ideas to Niala as a text or voice memo to 202-918-4893.

Go deeper:

Transcript

MARGARET TALEV: Good morning! Welcome to Axios Today!

It’s Friday October 29th. I’m Margaret Talev, filling in for Niala Boodhoo.

Here’s what you need to know today: High stakes for the new Biden social spending framework. Plus, oil and gas executives face a grilling on the Hill.

But first, today’s One Big Thing: answers to your questions on the COVID vaccine for kids.

The rollout for the Pfizer COVID vaccine for kids ages five through 11 could begin as early as next week. So we asked you for your questions about how this will work and Axios’ healthcare editor Tina Reed has been tracking down some answers for you. Hey Tina.

TINA REED: Hi Margaret.

MARGARET: Before we get to those listener questions, when can we expect final approval and what should parents be doing right now to prepare?

TINA: We're expecting as early as today, we could see FDA approval, and then next week on Tuesday, a CDC committee's going to weigh in on it. And the CDC director is expected to give the okay. So that means shots could be in arms as early as the next Wednesday.

MARGARET: Oh, so everyone's fine for thanksgiving then?

TINA: Not exactly. I actually asked this question to Dr. Claire Boogaard over at Children's National Hospital. She's the medical director of the COVID-19 vaccine program there. Here's what she had to say.

DR. CLAIRE BOOGAARD: Still be vigilant over the holiday, wear your mask. No child under 11 in America will be fully protected by Thanksgiving.

MARGARET: We also got a question from Dan in Ohio about his two daughters who are four and five years old. He asks: “How much additional protection does the vaccine offer compared to the protection of their age?”

TINA: So your age actually doesn't offer any protection. I was speaking to Dr. Boogaard about this as well and while we have definitely seen that children do seem to be less likely to have severe outcomes with COVID-19, there are still concerns about certain kinds of heart inflammation, the potential for long COVID with kids. So when you look at that, compared to the protection from a COVID-19 vaccine, at least in her opinion, there really is no comparison. The vaccine wins.

MARGARET: Okay. We also heard from Kristi in Dearborn, Michigan,

KRISTI: I'm wondering what the vaccine recommendations are related to concerns with boys and myocarditis and pericarditis. I don't want to risk long-term heart issues for a possibly mild case of COVID because they're so young.

TINA: Speaking with Dr. Boogaard, she actually said this is another concern that she's heard a lot from parents. She said when you look at the numbers of heart inflammation cases in kids, first of all, it was mostly seen in young men. So we're talking kids in their adolescence. She's still telling parents the higher risk is the risk that comes from COVID-19 itself. She would still recommend the vaccine.

MARGARET: Tina finally, we heard from another parent in Colorado and she's asking about her daughter, who's going to be 12 in February. She wants to know: is it better for her children to get the dose which is one third of the adult dose or just wait three months and then get the full dose vaccine?

TINA: So Dr. Boogaard said that she would go for the children's dose, not wait for the adult dose. Her reasoning was not only the fact that the child could get the protection sooner, when they tested this vaccine, they were testing it in children who were in the obese or overweight categories. So these were children who were getting the same sort of antibodies based off of a third of a dose. So it turns out kids' immune systems are really, really effective. And that's why they're able to do a third of the dose and get such a good immune response.

MARGARET: Any other questions that you're hearing frequently or any other answers that you want to share with us from the doctor?

TINA: One of the questions that I've heard a few times is whether or not it's okay to take your kid to a pharmacy to get a vaccine instead of your pediatrician's office. The answer that I've heard from multiple sources is yes, it's totally fine. Particularly if you don't have a lot of questions, go ahead and take them to the pharmacy.

MARGARET: Tina Reed is Axios’ healthcare editor. Thanks Tina.

TINA: Thanks Margaret.

MARGARET: In 15 seconds: what you need to know about the week in politics.

[ad break]

MARGARET: Welcome back to Axios Today! I’m Margaret Talev.

President Biden told lawmakers yesterday that quote "my presidency will be determined" unquote by the passage of his two major spending bills -- the $1.75 trillion social safety net expansion, and the $1.2 trillion infrastructure package. But last night the House delayed a vote on the bipartisan infrastructure bill, without the votes to move ahead. So it’s definitely going to pass, right?

I asked Axios’ Hans Nichols: what happened yesterday...and what comes next?

HANS NICHOLS: So think of what happened on Thursday as a trust exercise gone wrong, like when you try to fall back into a crowd and your colleagues catch you. What happened was the president wanted to fall back. He said, “Trust me. We're all trusting each other. We're all one united party. We're going to get this done.” And then he gets on his plane. He flies off to Rome and there's no deal, no deal before he even lands. And in a lot of ways, there's kind of more mistrust now than before he came and spoke.

Progressives really want to see a firm commitment from Senator Manchin that he's going to vote for this overall social spending bill and climate change. Manchin pointedly has not said he's going to do it. They want to see a firm affirmation from Senator Kyrsten Sinema - the progressives do - that she's going to be for it. That's not there. So, you know, they've got a month to figure this out, right? They're basically punting. I mean, in some ways they almost have a month and a half, two months.

And there isn't really a hard deadline because it's not like the infrastructure package goes stale, but there is a diminishing lack of trust and that's a currency that seems to be devaluing. And that's the very currency that Democrats are going to need if they want to get this across the line. And by this, I mean, both the infrastructure bill and the separate social spending and climate package.

MARGARET: Thanks as always to Axios political reporter Hans Nichols.

Top executives from Exxon, BP, Chevron and Shell were grilled at a historic hearing on Capitol Hill yesterday. Lawmakers accused them of knowing their companies were contributing to climate change and spending millions of dollars to promote climate denial. None of the executives agreed to stop lobbying against climate legislation when pressed by Representative Carolyn Maloney.

REP. CAROLYN MALONEY: I'm asking if you'll stop spending money either directly or indirectly to oppose efforts to reduce emissions and address climate change. Just stop spending money that’s a lie. Okay, I’ll take it that you don't want to take the pledge. All right.

MARGARET: Joining me now is Axios’ climate and energy reporter, Andrew Freedman. Hi Andrew.

ANDREW FREEDMAN: Hi.

MARGARET: Andrew catches up quick. What was the hearing supposed to accomplish?

ANDREW: The hearing was really supposed to showcase the misinformation tactics of the fossil fuel industry over the last several decades and the extent to which it continues today. The Democrats are trying to ease the way forward for clean energy legislation perhaps, to get the industry to change its ways and back off. And in other ways, you know, there is room for some government regulations. And there was a debate over this between Democrats and Republicans: does the first amendment protect speech in all cases, especially when it is speech that is essentially untruthful and getting across a message that is misleading people?

MARGARET: Where does this go? What does it all add up to?

ANDREW: I think they're gonna continue investigating for the next year. And this is very, you know, connected to a lot of the demands that climate activists are making of the Democratic party to hold companies accountable for causing climate change.

MARGARET: Andrew Freedman is a climate and energy reporter for Axios. Thanks so much.

ANDREW: Thanks for having me.

MARGARET: And one more note on this story: Representative Maloney said at the end of yesterday’s hearing that she intends to subpoena oil companies and trade groups for key documents related to all this.

That’s it for us this week!

Axios Today is brought to you by Axios and Pushkin Industries.

We’re produced by Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, David Toledo, and Lydia McMullen-Laird. Our sound engineers are Alex Sugiura and Ben O’Brien. Dan Bobkoff our Executive Producer leaves us this week -- thanks for everything Dan. Sara Kehaulani Goo is our Editor In Chief. And special thanks to Axios co-founder Mike Allen.

I’m Margaret Talev, in for Niala Boodhoo - thanks for listening - stay safe - and have the best Halloween weekend.

Go deeper

18 hours ago - Health

Pfizer could have vaccine data for children under five by end of 2021, CEO says

A health care worker administers a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID vaccine to a child at a Salvation Army vaccination clinic in Philadelphia on Nov. 12. Photo: Hannah Beier/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Pfizer could have data on COVID-19 vaccine efficacy for children under five by the end of the year, CEO Albert Bourla said on Friday in an interview with NBC News.

Why it matters: Omicron has raised concerns that young children are becoming more vulnerable to the virus. Tshwane, the epicenter of South Africa's Omicron outbreak, has seen a high number of hospital admissions for children under two in the last few weeks, though scientists have not confirmed a link to the variant, Reuters reports.

Abrams’ campaign manager rules out 2024 run if she wins governor's race

Photo: Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

In her first major interview since the official announcement, Stacey Abrams' campaign manager Lauren Groh-Wargo quashed speculation that the Georgia Democrat would interrupt a theoretical gubernatorial term to run for president in 2024.

Why it matters: Abrams' name has come up repeatedly as a top 2024 Democratic contender given President Joe Biden's age and Vice President Kamala Harris's low favorability rating.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
Updated 41 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Trump social media group raises $1 billion from undisclosed investors

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Donald Trump's social media startup on Saturday announced that it secured $1 billion in new investment as part of its ongoing efforts to become publicly traded via a blank check company.

Between the lines: None of the investors were identified, which is highly unusual for this sort of transaction.