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Expand chart
Data: Axios/Ipsos survey; Chart: Axios Visuals

Americans are more eager to get a coronavirus vaccine now that the process is underway, according to the latest installment of the Axios-Ipsos Coronavirus Index.

Why it matters: This is an encouraging sign, and an indication that at least some vaccine hesitancy was simple wait-and-see caution — not dug-in opposition.

By the numbers: 60% of Americans say they’re likely to take a vaccine as soon as it’s available to them, up 8 percentage points since mid-December.

  • There was a staggering 20-point jump in the number of Hispanic respondents who said they’d get vaccinated right away. Seniors also became much more amenable to a vaccine.

Between the lines: Last year, when vaccines weren’t yet available to anyone, the Axios-Ipsos survey has consistently shown that people were putting a higher premium on ensuring that vaccines were safe than on getting one right away.

  • Now that inoculations have begun, and no serious safety issues have arisen, more people are feeling more comfortable about claiming their spot in line.

Real-world experience with this worsening pandemic may also be driving more interest in a vaccine: 44% of Hispanic Americans in our survey said they know someone who has died from COVID-19, as did 34% of Black respondents and 31% of white Americans.

Yes, but: There’s still a stubborn partisan divide, with Democrats significantly more likely than Republicans to say they’ll get vaccinated promptly.

Expand chart
Data: Axios/Ipsos survey; Chart: Axios Visuals

Methodology: This Axios/Ipsos Poll was conducted Jan. 8-11 by Ipsos' KnowledgePanel®. This poll is based on a nationally representative probability sample of 1,038 adults. The margin of error is ±3.4 percentage points.

Go deeper

9 hours ago - Health

U.S. surpasses 400,000 coronavirus deaths on Trump's final full day in office

Expand chart
Data: CSSE Johns Hopkins University; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Over 400,000 people have died from the coronavirus in the U.S. as of Tuesday, per Johns Hopkins data.

Why it matters: It only took a little over a month for the U.S. to reach this mass casualty after 300,000 COVID deaths were reported last month. That's over 100,000 fatalities in 36 days.

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
18 hours ago - Health

Racial disparities already emerging in vaccinations

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Black Americans are being vaccinated at far lower rates than white Americans in the states that collect such information, Kaiser Health News reports.

Why it matters: Communities of color are disproportionately vulnerable to the virus, and the vaccination trend so far is likely perpetuating these disparities.

11 hours ago - Health

Fauci: U.S. could achieve herd immunity by fall if vaccine rollout goes to plan

NIAID director Anthony Fauci. Photo: Patrick Semansky-Pool/Getty Images

Infectious disease expert Anthony Fauci said on Tuesday that if the coronavirus vaccine rollout by the incoming Biden administration goes as planned, the U.S. could start to see effects of herd immunity and normalcy by early-to-mid fall.

What he's saying: "If we [vaccinate] efficiently in April, May, June, July, August, we should have that degree of protection that could get us back to some form of normality. ... But we've also got to do it on a global scale," he said at a Harvard Business Review virtual event.