Get the latest market trends in your inbox

Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic insights with the Axios Markets newsletter. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Cars at a Chevy dealership in Illinois. Photo: John Gress/Corbis via Getty Images

Last year's tax reform spurred stronger-than-expected car sales by giving consumers more disposable income, but the payback will come this spring when many Americans could discover they're not getting the tax refund they had expected.

Why it matters: Car sales are a key driver of the U.S. economy, and the industry sees a big uptick every spring as consumers turn their tax refund into a deposit on a new or used car. Without that seasonal bounce, 2019 auto sales may be lower, making a recession more likely.

The background, from Cox Automotive chief economist Jonathan Smoke, on the eve of this week's North American International Auto Show in Detroit:

  • The U.S. auto industry sold 17.2 million cars and light trucks in 2018 — the fourth-best year in history — and higher than most economists predicted.
  • The biggest reason for the missed forecasts: They underestimated how flush Americans would feel after Congress passed a massive tax cut in 2017.
  • Businesses also bought more vehicles for their corporate fleets, taking advantage of lower tax rates.

What's happening: Some consumers may be surprised to learn they are receiving no tax refund in 2019, a smaller one than expected or that they might even owe the government money, says Smoke.

Details:

  • More than 102 million Americans received an average tax refund of almost $2,800 last year.
  • When the new tax law took effect in early 2018, the IRS and Treasury Department rushed to change the tax tables, but many Americans failed to check the IRS withholding calculator and adjust their W-4 forms.
  • In July, the government warned that 30 million Americans were not withholding enough for taxes, meaning they felt richer than they were.

The problem could snowball if the government tries to fix hastily-made changes to the tax tables by over-correcting to withhold more money in future years, Smoke argues. In that case, consumers would see a decline in their net pay, cutting their spending power throughout the year.

  • "If we are correct, it’s a double whammy," says Smoke.

Yes, but: Tax reform isn't the only reason auto sales are likely to decline this year. Vehicles are becoming less affordable, due to tariffs on steel and other commodities, rising interest rates and the cost of premium features and technology.

The bottom line: Cox Automotive, the digital information giant behind AutoTrader, Kelly Blue Book and Manheim Auto Auctions, sees U.S. auto sales falling to 16.8 million units in 2019.

Go deeper: Electric vehicles surge but falling short of long-term global target

Go deeper

Trump threatens to veto Defense spending bill over social media shield

Photo: Erin Schaff - Pool/Getty Images

President Trump tweeted Tuesday a threat to veto a must-pass end-of-year $740 billion bill defense-spending authorization bill unless Congress repeals a federal law that protects social media sites from legal liability.

Why it matters: Trump's attempt to get Congress to end the tech industry protections under Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act is the latest escalation in his war on tech giants over what he and some other Republicans perceive as bias against conservatives.

The walls close in on Trump

Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

With Bill Barr's "Et tu, Brute!" interview with AP, President Trump is watching the walls close in on his claims of fraud, hoaxes and conspiracies.

Why it matters: Trump and his legal team continue to claim election fraud. But the Republican governors of Arizona and Georgia have certified their elections, a loyalist like Barr has weighed in, and lower-ranking officials have taken potshots.

Congress plots COVID pandemic-era office upgrades

oving crates outside Rep. Elise Stefanik's old office Tuesday. Photo: Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

The House plans to renovate members' suites even though staff are worried about an influx of contractors and D.C. is tightening restrictions on large gatherings, some staffers told Axios.

Why it matters: The Capitol has been closed to public tours since March. Work over the holiday season comes as U.S. coronavirus cases spike, Americans beg for more pandemic assistance and food lines grow.