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Photo: Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty

Nearly 6,500 athletes who qualified for the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo will keep their spots when the event takes place in 2021, according to new qualification rules announced by the International Olympic Committee Tuesday.

The big picture: The revision was made to address the impact of the coronavirus pandemic, replacing a previous version of the regulations from July 2017. The new qualifying deadline is June 29, 2021, and entry lists are due one week later.

  • 57% of the total athlete spots have already been assigned, with approximately 5,000 athlete quota places remaining, per the IOC.
  • It is possible for international federations to extend the age eligibility requirements, if they exist, and allow athletes eligible in 2020 to remain so and compete at next year's Games.
  • Respective sports federations around the world are still deciding their own qualifying procedures.

What they're saying:

"Athlete health is the guiding principle in the scheduling of any remaining Olympic qualification events. With the postponement of the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020 until 2021, the IOC has urged that any such events be confirmed only once the COVID-19 impacts can be assessed, allowing fair access and appropriate preparation for all competing athletes and teams."
— International Olympic Committee

What's next: The rescheduled Olympics are slated to take place July 23 through Aug. 8 next year.

Go deeper

Oct 15, 2020 - Sports

NCAA close to approving name, image and likeness compensation proposal for student athletes

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The NCAA is one step closer to allowing student athletes to earn compensation for their name, image and likeness, with a new proposal expected to be approved in January.

Details: Once approved, the bylaw would be implemented ahead of the 2021-22 school year.

Ben Geman, author of Generate
1 min ago - Economy & Business

GM's shrinking deal with Nikola

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

General Motors will no longer take an equity stake in Nikola Corp. or build its pickup truck, under a revised deal that still envisions GM as a key tech supplier for Nikola's planned line of electric and fuel cell heavy trucks.

Driving the news: The revised agreement Monday is smaller in scope than a draft partnership rolled out in September that had included a $2 billion stake in the startup and an agreement to build its Badger pickup.

49 mins ago - Technology

Exclusive: Facebook's blackout didn't dent political ad reach

Photo: Valera Golovniov/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Americans saw more political ads on Facebook in the week before the 2020 election than they did the prior week despite the company's blackout on new political ads during that period, according to Global Witness, a human rights group that espouses tech regulation.

Why it matters: The presidential election was a key stress test for Facebook and other leading online platforms looking to prove that they can curb misinformation. Critics contend measures like the ad blackout barely made a dent.