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Photo: Alex Tai/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Last week's report that Jeff Bezos' iPhone was allegedly hacked via a WhatsApp message from Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman discomfited a lot of Apple customers who long believed that one of the features of their high-priced phones was invulnerability.

The big picture: The flaw in this case was in WhatsApp, not the iPhone itself. But the larger lesson is that in a networked world full of incentives for digital mischief, there's no such thing as perfect security — only varying degrees of relative risk.

The iPhone has long been the safest bet for smartphone users, thanks to Apple's close control over the App Store and its tight reins on iOS.

  • The chief alternative, Google-developed Android, is an open-source project, which means phone manufacturers and software developers can easily adopt and adapt it for their own ends.
  • That flexibility has made Android cheaper and more ubiquitous than iOS, but it also means there are many "flavors" of its code with a wider range of bugs and flaws that offer hackers wider opportunities for attack.

The Washington Post lays out how iOS's and Android's differing software philosophies shape their security landscapes:

  • Open-source software like Android follows the principle that "given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow" — let the world pound on your system so you can find and fix as many flaws as possible. It's a messy approach that tends toward improvement as long as smart developers put their energy into squashing bugs.
  • Apple holds iOS code close, shares relatively little information about flaws, and provides all fixes and upgrades itself. That centralization keeps its software buttoned-down and clean.

The catch: Apple's approach, experts the Post talked to argue, also means that when there is an exploitable hole in iOS, it's easier to keep it secret and exploit it. That leaves "high-value targets" — like, say, billionaire Bezos — more likely to fall victim to high-value hacks.

The bottom line: As security researcher Patrick Wardle told the Post: “A lot of Apple security is amazing and really benefits the average user, but once you’re a target of an advanced adversary or three letter agency, the advanced security of these devices can be used against you."

Go deeper: The Bezos hack's shockwaves

Go deeper

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Health: Several states report zero COVID deaths for the first time in months — CDC says schools should still universally require masks and physical distancing.
  2. Politics: New York to lift mask mandate for vaccinated people — CDC director says politics didn't play a role in abrupt mask policy shift.
  3. Vaccines: Sanofi, GSK COVID vaccine shows strong immune response in phase 2 trials — Vaccine-hesitant Americans cite inaccurate side effects — 600,000 kids between 12 and 15 have received Pfizer dose since FDA authorization.
  4. Business: How retailers are responding to the latest CDC guidance — Delta to require all new employees be vaccinated — Target, CVS and other stores ease mask requirements after CDC guidance.
  5. World: World's largest vaccine maker expects to resume exports by end of 2021 — Biden administration to send 20 million U.S.-authorized vaccine doses abroad.
  6. Variant tracker: Where different strains are spreading.
2 hours ago - World

Scoop: Biden to waive sanctions on company in charge of Nord Stream 2

Angela Merkel (left) with Vladimir Putin. Photo: Adam Berry/Getty Images

The Biden administration will waive sanctions on the corporate entity and CEO overseeing the construction of Russia’s Nord Stream 2 pipeline into Germany, according to two sources briefed on the decision.

Why it matters: The decision indicates the Biden administration is not willing to compromise its relationship with Germany over this pipeline, and underscores the difficulties President Biden faces in matching actions to rhetoric on a tougher approach to Russia.

Prosecutor: Fatal police shooting of Andrew Brown Jr. was "justified"

Khalil Ferebee (C), the son of Andrew Brown Jr., and attorneys Bakari Sellers (L) and Harry Daniel (R) at a May 11 news conference in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. Photo: Sean Rayford/Getty Images

A North Carolina prosecutor said Tuesday that the death of Andrew Brown Jr., a Black man fatally shot by sheriff's deputies last month, was "tragic" but "justified," due to the immediate threat officers believed Brown posed.

Why it matters: The FBI has opened a civil rights investigation into Brown's death. Police in Elizabeth City shot him five times, including in the back of his head, according to an independent autopsy report released by family attorneys last month.