Nov 15, 2019

Apple "research" app brings health data to the upscale masses

There are three longitudinal studies on the Apple Research app. Photo: Apple

Apple released on Thursday an app for iPhone and Apple Watch users to participate in three longitudinal health data studies.

The big picture: Apple is just one of several Silicon Valley companies investing in health tech and transforming the future use of health data. Clinical trials via phone could increase participation rates, compared to traditional in-person studies.

  • Apple addresses privacy concerns by promising not to sell user data and allowing users to pick what they want to share, among other options.
  • Apple is funding the research, while health agencies and educational institutions will study and track the data. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Brigham and Women's Hospital, American Heart Association and World Health Organization are conducting the research.

The voluntary studies:

  • Track heart beat to learn early warning signs of atrial fibrillation, heart disease or declining mobility.
  • Track menstrual cycles and how they relate to women's health conditions such as infertility and polycystic ovary syndrome.
  • Collect headphone usage and environmental sound exposure data to track hearing impact over time.

Yes, but, per NYT: Data from iPhone and Apple Watch owners is an unrepresentative sample of society. "People who use iPhones have a median income of about $89,000 compared with $64,510 for Android users, according to recent data from Comscore."

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Trump threatens to deploy military amid national unrest

President Trump announced from the White House Rose Garden Monday evening that he is "mobilizing all available federal resources, civilian and military" to stop violent protests across the country, decrying "professional anarchists, looters, criminals, antifa and others" whose actions have "gripped" the nation.

The backdrop: Trump's announcement came as police clashed with protesters just outside of the White House, using tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse crowds chanting, "Hands up, don't shoot," and other slogans. Flash bangs used outside the White House could be heard from the Rose Garden.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Autopsies say George Floyd's death was homicide

Police watch as demonstrators block a roadway while protesting the death of George Floyd in Miami. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Preliminary results from an independent autopsy commissioned by George Floyd's family found that his death in the custody of Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was "homicide caused by asphyxia due to neck and back compression that led to a lack of blood flow to the brain," according to a statement from the family's attorney.

The latest: An updated official autopsy released by the Hennepin County medical examiner also determined that the manner of Floyd's death was "homicide," ruling it was caused by "cardiopulmonary arrest complicating law enforcement subdued, restraint, and neck compression."

The Biden-Trump split screen

Photos via Getty Images: Jim Watson/AFP (L); Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency (R)

The differences between former Vice President Joe Biden and President Trump are plain as day as the two respond to recent protests.

Why it matters: Americans are seeing firsthand how each presidential nominee responds to a national crisis happening during a global pandemic.