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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

With the iPhone's global dominance waning, there's a growing chorus of skeptics betting that Apple is headed the way of Blackberry and Nokia.

Why it matters: While Apple still generates ridiculous cash flow, the nearly $900 billion megacompany's growth is built on its ability to reinvent and dominate entire product categories, which it hasn't done lately. Doubters don't see evidence that Apple still has the innovative juice it needs to dominate not just tech but the global consumer marketplace.

The iPhone is Apple’s most important product and generates the bulk of its revenue. The App Store and various other offerings feed off the iPhone's ubiquity and popularity.

  • But the iPhone is fast losing market share, and Apple services like streaming music, streaming video and home speakers show no signs of generating similar cash flow.
  • Without Steve Jobs, Apple has struggled to keep up the pace and magnitude of innovations.; Apple Watch, AirPods and other "wearables" are buzzy, but account for a fraction of the company's earnings.
  • "There are just too many negatives," Richard Mathes, president of asset manager Mathes Company, who dumped all his Apple holdings earlier this year, tells Axios. "They’re going to be a slower growth company going forward."

Apple's biggest problem is China, where it is no longer seen as a trend-setting company and the new iPhone has stopped being a must-have, luxury product, says Linda Zhang, CEO of Purview Investments.

  • "The competition is getting fierce, with local brands coming a long way in innovation and quality, at competitive prices."

By the numbers: Globally, consumers are slower to upgrade, and they're switching brands.

  • Apple saw a 30% decline in shipments in Q1 2019 from last year, as "the iPhone struggled to win over consumers in most major markets," data from market research firm IDC shows.
  • It now holds just 11.7% of global smartphone market share, down more than 25% from a year ago.
  • The U.S., where Apple holds its largest market share, saw the biggest decline in shipments.
  • Shipments for Apple's iOS platform are expected to fall by more than 12% this year.

Investors have taken notice. Following the company's first quarter earnings report — which beat expectations, but revealed the steepest decline ever in iPhone sales — Apple has been by far the most shorted company in the world, according to data provided to Axios from data firm S3 Partners.

  • In April, short interest levels were almost double that of the No. 2 most shorted company, Tesla.
  • Its stock has posted solid gains in recent years, but critics point to Apple's growing reliance on stock buybacks — announcing more than $100 billion in repurchases last year.

Yes, but: This could all turn around — because we really don't know what Apple is cooking. The iPhone itself was a second act for Apple, which nearly died in the late '90s.

  • Apple has suggested it's got things in the works on the health/wellness front, leveraging the Apple Watch and its privacy reputation.
  • According to The Information, Apple is in talks to buy Intel’s modem business to boost its 5G capabilities, though it’s still expected to sit out of the first wave of 5G adoption.
  • Companies like Microsoft and IBM have found ways to age gracefully, finding new revenue streams and delivering shareholder value.
  • Overall, analysts have remained enthusiastic about Apple stock, with “buy” ratings edging out “holds.”

Apple representatives declined to comment.

Our thought bubble from Scott Rosenberg, Axios managing editor for technology: The iPhone was such a monster product that Apple is unlikely to repeat the success, and for investors that may be argument enough to see the company as overvalued. But in Silicon Valley, there's still plenty of respect for Apple's potential to keep innovating.

But folks outside Silicon Valley are starting to see a different story. Aija Leiponen, professor of applied economics at Cornell’s SC Johnson College of Business, told Axios in March she's been wary of Apple's new offerings.

  • "Maybe there will be another breakthrough, but I don’t see it right now."

Go deeper:

What Apple knows about you

The inside story of Apple’s new Mac Pro

Apple buys voice startup Pullstring

Go deeper

White House says it expects federal contractors to be vaccinated by Dec. 8

Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The White House said in new guidance Friday that it expects millions of federal contractors to be vaccinated against the coronavirus no later than Dec. 8.

Why it matters: Companies with federal contractors have been waiting for formal guidance from the White House before requiring those employees to get vaccinated, according to Reuters.

CDC director maintains Pfizer booster recommendation for high-risk workers

Rochelle Walensky listens during a confirmation hearing on July 20. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/The New York Times/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention director Rochelle Walensky on Friday reiterated her decision to go against a recommendation by a CDC advisory panel that refused to endorse booster shots for workers whose jobs put them at high risk for contracting COVID-19.

Driving the news: "Our healthcare systems are once again at maximum capacity in parts of the country, our teachers are facing uncertainty as they walk into the classroom," Walensky said at a Friday briefing. "I must do what I can to preserve the health across our nation."

2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Democrats release full text of Biden's $3.5T reconciliation package

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) on Friday unveiled the full text of President Biden's $3.5 trillion social spending package.

Why it matters: Democrats are racing to finish negotiations and get the bill on the floor as soon as possible so Pelosi can fulfill her promises to both House centrists and progressives about the timing and sequencing of passing the party's dual infrastructure packages.