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Courtesy: Ubisoft

The Apple/Epic trial includes formerly private emails between top CEOs and officials.

Why it matters: Both companies introduced documents into the court record highlighting each other’s failures, though that also showed how they handle emergencies.

Apple officials seemed horrified in May 2018 when a developer complained that a game about a school shooting made it onto the app store just two months after the massacre at Stoneman Douglas High School.

  • "I am extremely appalled that Apple would approve such an app," the developer wrote in an email.
  • After a forward from Apple CEO Tim Cook, the game was removed from its store and the developer was banned. It was gone within 24 hours of the initial email.
  • Apple was notorious among app developers for being heavy-handed in prohibiting games with edgy content. But an internal review revealed that the app had been approved in less than 32 seconds.

Epic's Sweeney emailed Ubisoft CEO Yves Guillemot in May 2019 with the subject line: "Apology: Epic Store Woes" following a spike in fraudulent purchases of Ubisoft's "The Division 2" on the Epic Games Store

  • "In the past 48 hours, the rate of fraudulent transactions on Division 2 surpassed 70%, and was approaching 90%," Sweeney wrote, saying fraud of other games on the nascent EGS was just 2%.
  • People had figured out how to buy Ubisoft games on the Epic Games Store with stolen credit cards, and hang onto the games via an online Ubisoft service called Uplay before Epic could catch them.
  • Sweeney said Ubisoft's games would be temporarily pulled from the store, assuring Guillemot that "minimum revenue guarantees" will remain in place and putting the fault entirely on Epic. "I'm sorry for the trouble," he wrote.

Go deeper: The trial also revealed a lot of details about Epic's "Fortnite"-fueled finances and the cost of its biggest bets

Go deeper

Legal fight with Apple exposes Epic Games' inner workings

Image from a 2020 internal Epic Games presentation to Apple. Screenshot: Epic Games

Epic Games paid $146 million to exclusively sell "Borderlands 3" as it splurged to make its nascent Epic Games Store competitive with dominant PC gaming marketplace Steam, according to documents revealed on day one of Epic's high-stakes trial against Apple.

Why it matters: The documents illustrate how Epic has fared the last few years during its extraordinary "Fortnite"-fueled run. If not for the trial, much of this info would never have been made public.

Ina Fried, author of Login
May 3, 2021 - Technology

The trial that will decide the future of Apple's App Store

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

A federal court in Oakland will on Monday begin hearing Epic Games' antitrust suit against Apple, a case that could radically reshape the way iPhone apps and services are sold.

Why it matters: Fortnite maker Epic Games is asking the court to invalidate the entire business model behind the iOS ecosystem, seeking to bar Apple from requiring developers to use its in-app purchases for digital goods and services.

Apple v. Epic Games trial provides heavily redacted peek inside the industry

Photo: Microsoft

Court filings from the Apple and Epic Games faceoff offer a peek at the inner workings of some major players in gaming.

Why it matters: Gaming is as secretive an industry as it gets, and companies such as Microsoft are locked into years-long competitive cycles against the likes of Nintendo and Sony.