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Buzz Aldrin on the surface of the moon during Apollo 11. Photo: NASA

A new website transports you back in time to 50 years ago, when Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins first shot for the Moon.

The big picture: Apolloinrealtime.org replays the experience of the Apollo 11 mission to the Moon in real time using archival footage from Mission Control, astronaut-shot footage, TV broadcasts and photos.

Details: The site organizes 11,000 hours of audio from Mission Control and all audio recorded onboard the spacecraft during the Moon mission.

  • Users can also search keywords they're most interested in. (Search the transcript for the term "salmon salad" if you want a real treat.)

"Listening to the Mission Control audio left me with the strong impression that it was just normal people doing the best they could, and they achieved greatness," Ben Feist, who created the project, tells Axios.

My take: As someone who missed the Apollo 11 landing by a couple decades, it's amazing to have access to this kind of real-time experience. After a while, these legendary astronauts start to sound like old friends as they do the work of living in space and getting to the Moon.

Go deeper: Read CollectSpace.com's interview with Ben Feist

Go deeper

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Yes, but: This is 2020, when nothing matters.

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Higher education expands its climate push

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New or expanded climate initiatives are popping up at several universities, a sign of the topic's rising prominence and recognition of the threats and opportunities it creates.

Why it matters: Climate and clean energy initiatives at colleges and universities are nothing new, but it shows expanded an campus focus as the effects of climate change are becoming increasingly apparent, and the world is nowhere near the steep emissions cuts that scientists say are needed to hold future warming in check.

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The pandemic isn't slowing tech

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Thursday's deluge of Big Tech earnings reports showed one thing pretty clearly: COVID-19 may be bad in all sorts of ways, but it's not slowing down the largest tech companies. If anything, it's helping some companies, like Amazon and Apple.

Yes, but: With the pandemic once again worsening in the U.S. and Europe, it's not clear how long the tech industry's winning streak can last.