Mar 5, 2019

Apex Legends outpaces Fortnite in registered users

Fortnite is still the darling of the video game industry, generating hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue per month. However, a month-old game called Apex Legends is growing far faster than even Fortnite did, at least as measured by signing up users.

Data: Roundhill Investments; Chart: Chris Canipe/Axios

Driving the news: The game's creators announced Monday that they have reached 50 million registered players in the first 28 days. (It took Fortnite more than 16 weeks to hit that level.)

  • Both titles are from the "battle royale" genre of video game. Per Wikipedia, that means they blend "the survival, exploration and scavenging elements of a survival game with last-man-standing gameplay."

Yes, but: Registered users is one measure, but long-term value comes by ensuring users remain active to generate revenue.

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Situational awareness

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Catch up on today's biggest news:

  1. Scoop: New White House personnel chief tells Cabinet liaisons to target Never Trumpers
  2. Trump misrepresents 2020 Russia briefing as Democratic "misinformation"
  3. Bernie Sanders takes aim at Bloomberg: "Trump will chew him up and spit him out"
  4. Nearly half of Republicans support pardoning Roger Stone
  5. Scoop: Lyft acquires cartop advertising startup Halo Cars

Sanders takes aim at Bloomberg: "Trump will chew him up and spit him out"

Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

Bernie Sanders told CBS "60 Minutes" that he was surprised by Mike Bloomberg's lackluster performance at Wednesday's Democratic debate.

What he's saying: "If that's what happened in a Democratic debate, you know, I think it's quite likely that Trump will chew him up and spit him out."

Scoop: Lyft acquires cartop advertising startup Halo Cars

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Lyft has acquired Halo Cars, a small startup that lets ride-hailing drivers earn money via ad displays mounted atop their cars. Lyft confirmed the deal but declined to share any details.

Why it matters: Ride-hailing companies are increasingly eyeing additional ways to generate revenue, and Lyft rival Uber has been quietly testing a partnership with New York-based Cargo that gives it a cut of the advertising revenue, as I previously reported.