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Former Trump communications director Anthony Scaramucci says chief of staff John Kelly should resign. (Photo: Ina Fried/Axios)

Former White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci reiterated his call for the ouster of Chief of Staff John Kelly, citing low White House morale. "He’s lost the locker room," Scaramucci said at the NewCo Shift Forum in San Francisco on Tuesday. "The morale in the White House, on a scale of 1-10, is minus 15. You cannot run the White House through fear and intimidation."

Why it matters: Scaramucci has held his tongue on most issues since leaving the administration; But not any more. The former comms director has been calling for Kelly to step down over his handling of the Rob Porter scandal, saying that Kelly knew about Porter's history of domestic abuse for months. "You can’t ask people in the White House to cover up something like this," Scaramucci said.

On his tenure as White House communications director: "I was there for 11 days... 954,000 seconds. Me and my therapist sort of think about it that way."

On life after the White House: "I have the name recognition of Melania or Ivanka and I didn’t have to be the president’s wife or daughter. So I think it worked out pretty well."

On gun control: "I'm pro-second amendment and you’ve got to stop the mass shootings."

On marriage equality: "Life liberty and the pursuit of happiness... Is that only for straight people? ... Republicans are for smaller government everywhere except the bedroom... We should knock that nonsense off too."

Go deeper

Republicans pledge to set aside differences and work with Biden

President Biden speaks to Sen. Mitch McConnell after being sworn in at the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. Photo: Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty Images

Several Republicans praised President Biden's calls for unity during his inaugural address on Wednesday and pledged to work together for the benefit of the American people.

Why it matters: The Democrats only have a slim majority in the Senate and Biden will likely need to work with the GOP to pass his legislative agenda.

The Biden protection plan

Joe Biden announces his first run for the presidency in June 1987. Photo: Howard L. Sachs/CNP/Getty Images

The Joe Biden who became the 46th president on Wednesday isn't the same blabbermouth who failed in 1988 and 2008.

Why it matters: Biden now heeds guidance about staying on task with speeches and no longer worries a gaffe or two will cost him an election. His staff also limits the places where he speaks freely and off the cuff. This Biden protective bubble will only tighten in the months ahead, aides tell Axios.

Bush labels Clyburn the “savior” for Democrats

House Majority Whip James Clyburn takes a selfie Wednesday with former President George W. Bush. Photo: Patrick Semansky-Pool/Getty Images

Former President George W. Bush credited Rep. James Clyburn with being the "savior" of the Democratic Party, telling the South Carolinian at Wednesday's inauguration his endorsement allowed Joe Biden to win the party's presidential nomination.

Why it matters: The nation's last two-term Republican president also said Clyburn's nod allowed for the transfer of power, because he felt only Biden had the ability to unseat President Trump.