Dec 21, 2017

Another federal judge temporarily halts Trump's birth control rule

A one-month pack of hormonal birth control pills. Photo: Rich Pedroncelli / AP

A federal judge in California temporarily blocked the Trump administration from enforcing new contraception rules, Reuters reports. The rules would have allowed employers to deny an Obamacare requirement mandating them to provide insurance that covers women's birth control.

Why it matters: This ruling follows a similar decision made last week by a federal judge in Philadelphia against the policy. That judge said it would cause serious and irreparable harm, according to multiple reports.

On Thursday, Judge Haywood Gilliam, Jr., said the administration failed to carry out a notice and comment process before implementing the policy, which allows businesses or nonprofits to obtain exemptions on moral or religious grounds, per Reuters. The ruling puts the policy on hold while a lawsuit challenging its legality proceeds.

Background: The suit was filed by Democratic attorneys general in California, Delaware, Maryland, New York and Virginia, per Reuters. California officials reportedly said the federal directive would affect about 6.8 million residents.

Go deeper: Trump administration rolls back ACA contraception mandate

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Trump says he will campaign against Lisa Murkowski after her support for Mattis

Trump with Barr and Meadows outside St. John's Episcopal church in Washington, D.C. on June 1. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump tweeted on Thursday that he would endorse "any candidate" with a pulse who runs against Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska).

Driving the news: Murkowski said on Thursday that she supported former defense secretary James Mattis' condemnation of Trump over his response to protests in the wake of George Floyd's killing. She described Mattis' statement as "true, honest, necessary and overdue," Politico's Andrew Desiderio reports.

8 hours ago - World

The president vs. the Pentagon

Trump visits Mattis and the Pentagon in 2018. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty

Over the course of just a few hours, President Trump was rebuffed by the Secretary of Defense over his call for troops in the streets and accused by James Mattis, his former Pentagon chief, of trampling the Constitution for political gain.

Why it matters: Current and former leaders of the U.S. military are drawing a line over Trump's demand for a militarized response to the protests and unrest that have swept the country over the killing of George Floyd by police.

New York Times says Tom Cotton op-ed did not meet standards

Photo: Avalon/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

A New York Times spokesperson said in a statement Thursday that the paper will be changing its editorial board processes after a Wednesday op-ed by Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.), which called for President Trump to "send in the troops" in order to quell violent protests, failed to meet its standards.

Why it matters: The shift comes after Times employees began a coordinated movement on social media on Wednesday and Thursday that argued that publishing the op-ed put black staff in danger. Cotton wrote that Trump should invoke the Insurrection Act in order to deploy the U.S. military against rioters that have overwhelmed police forces in cities across the country.