Photo: Clemens Bilan - Pool/Getty Images

German Chancellor Angela Merkel has tested negative for COVID-19, her spokesperson said Monday, per AP.

The big picture: The 65-year-old went into self-quarantine Sunday after she learned that a doctor who had given her a pneumococcal infection vaccination tested positive for the illness. She will receive further testing in the coming days, according to the spokesperson.

Go deeper: Germany bans public gatherings of more than 2 people

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Updated Jul 10, 2020 - Health

U.S. coronavirus updates

Data: The COVID Tracking Project; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

South Carolina restaurants and bars will have to close alcohol sales by 11 p.m., beginning Saturday, under an order issued Friday by Gov. Henry McMaster.

The big picture: The U.S. had another record single-day spike of 63,200 new coronavirus cases from Thursday. COVID-19 cases in South Carolina have increased, with 21,560 cases recorded in the last two weeks.

Jun 30, 2020 - Health

CDC expert warns U.S. has "way too much virus" to contain outbreak

CDC principal deputy director Anne Schuchat speaks during a February White House briefing as CDC director Robert Redfield, Vice President Mike Pence and President Trump look on. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The novel coronavirus is spreading too widely and quickly to contain, CDC principal deputy director Anne Schuchat told The Journal of the American Medical Association Monday, warning she expects "this virus to continue to circulate."

Why it matters: Per Schuchat, "This is really the beginning, and what we hope is that we can take it seriously and slow the transmission." Her comments are in contrast to those of senior members of the Trump administration — notably Vice President Mike Pence, who said on Friday "we have made truly remarkable progress."

Jun 30, 2020 - Sports

How the NBA's "smart rings" work to assess coronavirus risk

Courtesy: Oura Ring

When play resumes a month from now at Walt Disney World, NBA players will have the option of wearing an Oura Ring.

Why it matters: The rings track heart and respiratory rate, as well as temperature and sleep patterns. The hope is that they can be an additional line of defense against the spread of COVID-19.