Andrew Yang speaks on the campaign trail on Feb. 5 in New Hampshire. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Former tech executive and 2020 presidential hopeful Andrew Yang laid off "dozens of campaign staffers this week" after performing poorly in the Iowa caucuses, Politico reports.

The big picture: The full results of the caucus have not yet been released and Democratic National Committee chair Tom Perez called for Iowa Democrats to "immediately begin a recanvass" on Thursday. Yet even with a recanvass, Yang is unlikely to beat top 2020 candidates or see significantly different results.

"As part of our original plans following the Iowa caucuses, we are winding down our Iowa operations and restructuring to compete as the New Hampshire primary approaches. These actions are a natural evolution of the campaign post-Iowa, same as other campaigns have undertaken, and Andrew Yang is going to keep fighting for the voices of the more than 400,000 supporters who have donated to the campaign and placed a stake in the future of our country."
— Andrew Yang's campaign manager, Zach Graumann, in a statement on Thursday

Details: Those dismissed from the campaign include Yang's national political and policy directors, Politico reports, as well as his deputy national political director.

What they're saying: Several former campaign staffers, speaking to Politico on the condition of anonymity, said that "many people expected staffing changes after New Hampshire, not Iowa" and described the layoffs as unorganized.

  • But, those staffers "said they still believe in Yang and his mission."

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