Andrew Yang speaks on the campaign trail on Feb. 5 in New Hampshire. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Former tech executive and 2020 presidential hopeful Andrew Yang laid off "dozens of campaign staffers this week" after performing poorly in the Iowa caucuses, Politico reports.

The big picture: The full results of the caucus have not yet been released and Democratic National Committee chair Tom Perez called for Iowa Democrats to "immediately begin a recanvass" on Thursday. Yet even with a recanvass, Yang is unlikely to beat top 2020 candidates or see significantly different results.

"As part of our original plans following the Iowa caucuses, we are winding down our Iowa operations and restructuring to compete as the New Hampshire primary approaches. These actions are a natural evolution of the campaign post-Iowa, same as other campaigns have undertaken, and Andrew Yang is going to keep fighting for the voices of the more than 400,000 supporters who have donated to the campaign and placed a stake in the future of our country."
— Andrew Yang's campaign manager, Zach Graumann, in a statement on Thursday

Details: Those dismissed from the campaign include Yang's national political and policy directors, Politico reports, as well as his deputy national political director.

What they're saying: Several former campaign staffers, speaking to Politico on the condition of anonymity, said that "many people expected staffing changes after New Hampshire, not Iowa" and described the layoffs as unorganized.

  • But, those staffers "said they still believe in Yang and his mission."

Go deeper: Andrew Yang on the issues, in under 500 words

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Updated 47 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 30,782,337 — Total deaths: 957,037— Total recoveries: 21,032,539Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 6,764,962 — Total deaths: 199,258 — Total recoveries: 2,577,446 — Total tests: 94,211,463Map.
  3. Politics: In reversal, CDC again recommends coronavirus testing for asymptomatic people.
  4. Health: The dwindling chances of eliminating COVID-19.
  5. World: Guatemalan president tests positive for COVID-19 — The countries painting their pandemic recoveries green.

The positions of key GOP senators on replacing Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell talks to reporters on Capitol Hill last Thursday. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

With President Trump planning to nominate his third Supreme Court justice nominee by next week, key Republican senators are indicating their stance on replacing the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg just over six weeks out from Election Day.

The big picture: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) has vowed that "Trump’s nominee will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate." But Sen. Lisa Murkowski (Alaska) told Alaska Public Media, "I would not vote to confirm a Supreme Court nominee. We are 50 some days away from an election."

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

ActBlue collects a record $91 million in hours after Ginsburg's death

A makeshift memorial in honor of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on Sept. 19. Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

ActBlue received a record $91.4 million in the 28 hours following Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death, the Democratic donation-processing site confirmed to Axios late Saturday.

Why it matters via the New York Times: "The unprecedented outpouring shows the power of a looming Supreme Court confirmation fight to motivate Democratic donors."