Robert Mueller. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Random House announced Monday that Andrew Weissmann, a former prosecutor for special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation, will release a new book, titled "Where Law Ends: Inside the Mueller Investigation," about the probe on Sept. 29.

Why it matters: Weissmann helped Mueller lead the case against former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort, who ultimately pleaded guilty to conspiracy charges in 2018. Random House says the book will showcase "the painful deliberations, and mistakes of the team — not to mention the external efforts by the president and Attorney General William Barr to manipulate the investigation to their political ends."

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Scoop: Trump's spy chief releases new batch of Russia docs to Justice Department

Photo: Andrew Harnik-Pool/Getty Images

Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe has approved the release to the Department of Justice of a large binder full of documents to assist a review of the Obama administration's handling of the Trump-Russia investigation, according to a source with direct knowledge of the materials and confirmed by Ratcliffe.

Why it matters: The release, which is being revealed publicly for the first time today, comes as President Trump is urging his agencies to expedite the release of materials that he believes will be politically advantageous to him.

Pence to target Biden on terrorism, hostages in VP debate

Photo: David T. Foster III/Pool/Getty Images

Mike Pence's guest list for Wednesday's vice presidential debate in Salt Lake City will include the parents of murdered ISIS hostage Kayla Mueller, two senior administration officials with direct knowledge tell Axios.

Why it matters: The decision sheds light on Pence's strategy to target Joe Biden. Mueller's parents, Carl and Marsha, gave perhaps the most heart-wrenching speech of the Republican National Convention. But their remarks were also politically brutal, with Carl Mueller directly blaming the Obama-Biden administration for hiding behind policy and failing to save his daughter's life.

The cliffhanger could be ... Georgia

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

It hasn't backed a Democrat for president since 1992, but Georgia's changing demographics may prove pivotal this year — not only to Trump v. Biden, but also to whether Democrats take control of the Senate.

Why it matters: If the fate of the Senate did hinge on Georgia, it might be January before we know the outcome. Meanwhile, voters' understanding of this power in the final days of the election could juice turnout enough to impact presidential results.

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