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Eric Risberg / AP

Axios' Dan Primack sat down with the co-founder of Mosaic and Netscape, Marc Andreessen, who said "prices are spiraling out of control" in the healthcare and education sectors of the economy because of technology. He says productivity and tech innovation are not meeting expectations in America.

His prediction for for healthcare and education: Americans will continue paying more and more for sectors of the economy where tech hasn't had a big impact (healthcare, education, construction, and real estate), and we will pay less and less for things like media, retail, and financial services, where tech is impacting productivity.

The state of productivity and tech innovation right now: "The problem that we have today is not that we have too much tech innovation, the problem overwhelmingly is that we don't have enough...because…if we had higher productivity growth, we would have higher economic growth...higher job creation, faster rising income…people would be more optimistic about the future."

The evidence:

Part of how Trump won: He said it's about opportunities that aren't around in certain regions of the U.S., like in the Midwest. "I think it's a coastal conceit that 'these idiots cant keep up with the change…' it was not a question of the rate of change, it was a question of whether the opportunities existed…the people from the coasts show up and say we've got a solution, we're going to write you a bigger check…[those states] predictably flipped from Obama to Trump…"

How D.C. and SV can understand each other: "Technologists need to reach out…and do a much better jobs of explaining…[to D.C.] and exploring the ideas...equally the other side…need[s] to make an attempt to understand the technology."

On how SV talks about politics: "This fear of issues being politicized…is corrosive to discourse...Open discourse is drying up. Private discourse is probably getting more interesting...there's just certain areas where it's hard to have the discussions."

On car services, like Uber: "It's gonna be so cost effective and so safe to not drive," parents are probably going to push for it.

On flying cars: "It would be so disappointing if they're not in the air" in 10 to 15 years or so.

Go deeper

In photos: Protests outside fortified capitols draw only small groups

Armed members of the far-right extremist group the Boogaloo Bois near the Michigan Capitol Building in Lansing on Jan. 17. About 20 protesters showed up, AP notes. Photo: Seth Herald/AFP via Getty Images

Small groups of protesters rallied outside fortified statehouses over the weekend ahead of President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration Wednesday.

The big picture: Some protests attracted armed members of far-right extremist groups but there were no reports of clashes, as had been feared. The National Guard and law enforcement outnumbered demonstrators, as security was heightened around the U.S. to avoid a repeat of the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riots, per AP.

4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Trump to issue at least 100 pardons and commutations before leaving office

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump plans to issue at least 100 pardons and commutations on his final full day in office Tuesday, sources familiar with the matter told Axios.

Why it matters: This is a continuation of the president's controversial December spree that saw full pardons granted to more than two dozen people — including former Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort, longtime associate Roger Stone and Charles Kushner, the father of Trump's senior adviser and son-in-law, Jared Kushner.

  • The pardons set to be issued before Trump exits the White House will be a mix of criminal justice ones and pardons for people connected to the president, the sources said.
  • CNN first reported this news.

Go deeper: Convicts turn to D.C. fixers for Trump pardons

Schumer's m(aj)ority checklist

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Capitalizing on the Georgia runoffs, achieving a 50-50 Senate and launching an impeachment trial are weighty to-dos for getting Joe Biden's administration up and running on Day One.

What to watch: A blend of ceremonies, hearings and legal timelines will come into play on Tuesday and Wednesday so Chuck Schumer can actually claim the Senate majority and propel the new president's agenda.