Dec 20, 2018

Americans are getting heavier

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Data: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Americans are not getting taller, but they are gaining more weight, according to new CDC data. Since 1999, the average weight of men has increased from 189 pounds to 198 pounds. The average weight of women has gone up from 164 pounds to 171 pounds.

The bottom line: Obesity is more complicated than eating habits or exercise. But research has shown that gaining weight over time makes people more susceptible to other health risks like diabetes or heart disease.

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Study: 49% of American adults projected to be obese by 2030

A new study published by the New England Journal of Medicine estimates that almost half of American adults are expected be obese by 2030, and about 25% will be severely obese.

The big picture: The report used data from a decades-long federal study, while previous estimates typically rely on national health surveys, AP reports. The study found the prevalence of obesity among U.S. adults will vary across states and demographic subgroups.

Go deeperArrowDec 21, 2019

Women outpace men on U.S. payrolls

Data: Bureau of Labor Statistics; Note: Men count was derived by subtracting women count from total; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

There are more women on American payrolls than men as of the latest U.S. jobs report.

Why it matters: The data reflects a hiring boom in industries that are female-dominated, while sectors that are more likely to employ men are lagging in job gains. The last time women overtook men in payrolls was “during a stretch between June 2009 and April 2010,” according to the Wall Street Journal, which first reported the milestone.

Go deeperArrowJan 10, 2020

Coca-Cola ad campaign targeted teens as childhood obesity worsens

Boxes of Coca-Cola seen at a grocery store. Photo: Ronen Tivony/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Coca-Cola's advertising continues to target teenagers despite public-health concerns about childhood obesity, according to a paper published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.

Why it matters: Childhood obesity is expected to cost the U.S. $14 billion a year in direct health expenses. Rising obesity rates will translate into Type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

Go deeperArrowDec 19, 2019