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Children on a beach in American Samoa in 1965. Photo: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

A three-judge panel for the Tenth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled 2-1 Tuesday that the Fourteenth Amendment's Citizenship Clause does not apply to the U.S. territory of American Samoa, reversing a lower-court ruling.

Why it matters: American Samoa, which was annexed by the U.S. in the early 1900s and is home to more than 50,000 people, is one of the only places in the country where birthright citizenship does not apply. Many people in the territory hope it remains that way, while others desire automatic citizenship.

Between the lines: Because birthright citizenship has never applied to the five islands and two coastal atolls that comprise American Samoa, people born there do not automatically have the right to vote in U.S. presidential elections and cannot run for federal office, unless one of their parents is a citizen.

  • Currently, American Samoans are considered "nationals" and must go through the naturalization process. However, a group American Samoans have sued the federal government in an attempt to get the Citizenship Clause to apply to the territory.
  • Many Samoans do not want automatic citizenship because they consider themselves more Samoan than American and fear it will threaten their culture and how they manage property communally among families, according to AP.

State of play: Senior Circuit Judge Carlos Lucero and Chief Circuit Judge Timothy Tymkovich ruled in favor of the federal government, writing in the majority that Congress and not the courts must determine the citizenship status of people living in unincorporated territorial lands.

  • It reverses the U.S. District Court for the District of Utah's 2020 ruling on behalf of three American Samoans that the Citizenship Clause does apply to those born in the territory.
  • The government of American Samoa intervened in the case and asked the Tenth Circuit to reserve the ruling in Utah over concerns that it could damage Samoan culture the territory's autonomy.

What they're saying: "We conclude that neither constitutional text nor Supreme Court precedent demands the district court’s interpretation of the Citizenship Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment," Lucero wrote.

  • "We instead recognize that Congress plays the preeminent role in the determination of citizenship in unincorporated territorial lands, and that the courts play but a subordinate role in the process."
  • Lucero wrote he was sensitive to "the preference against citizenship expressed by the American Samoan people through their elected representatives" and added that "a people’s incorporation into the citizenry of another nation ought to be done with their consent or not done at all."

The other side: Circuit Judge Robert Bacharach disagreed, arguing the plaintiffs and all others born in the territory are citizens because American Samoa is a part of the U.S. and the Fourteenth Amendment applies to all parts of the country.

  • “From colonial days, Americans understood that citizenship extended to everyone within the sovereign’s dominion. So those in territories like American Samoa enjoy birthright citizenship, just like anyone else born in our country. The plaintiffs are thus U.S. citizens," Bacharach wrote.

What to watch: Rep. Aumua Amata (R-AS), a non-voting representative in Congress, wrote on Twitter in response to the ruling: "Congress should now act to pass my bill, H.R. 1941, so that U.S. Nationals who CHOOSE citizenship can quickly, sensibly and affordably make that change. Individuals should not have roadblocks to their self-determination if they choose citizenship."

Go deeper

Appeals court rules against Tennessee's restrictive abortion ban

Photo: Sarah Silbiger via Getty Images

The 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday upheld a lower court's decision to block a Tennessee law barring abortions after the detection of a "fetal heartbeat."

Why it matters: The ban, which also prohibits abortions if the justification relates to race, gender or medical diagnoses such as Down syndrome, is one of several restrictive abortion laws enacted in recent years.

The Exvangelicals

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Even as evangelicals maintain their position as the most popular religion in the U.S., a movement of self-described "exvangelicals" is breaking away, using social media to engage tens of thousands of former faithful.

The big picture: Donald Trump's presidency, as well as movements around LGBTQ rights, #MeToo and Black Lives Matter, drew more Americans into evangelical churches while also pushing some existing members away.

Updated 4 hours ago - Science

Huge wildfire reaches edge of Sequoia National Park

A plume of smoke and flames rise into the air as the fire burns towards Moro Rock during the KNP Complex fire in the Sequoia National Park near Three Rivers, California, on Saturday. Photo: Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Firefighters in Sequoia National Park were working into the night after two wildfires merged to reach the Giant Forest Saturday.

Why it matters: This forest contains over 2,000 giant sequoias, including the General Sherman Tree — the world's largest tree by volume. Park officials wrapped the redwoods in foil last week as the Paradise and Colony Fires, now known as the KNP Complex Fire, neared. Protection efforts appeared to be working overnight.

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