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America's work-life balance isn't so great

With 11% of U.S. employees working 50 or more hours a week and the average American spending 40% of their day dedicated to their jobs, the U.S. is on the lower end of work-life balance among developed countries.

Data: OECD; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

By the numbers: OECD looks at the percentage of workers who work long hours as well as the average time spent on leisure or personal activities — including eating and sleeping — in order to determine work-life balance. The Netherlands comes out on top. On average, the Dutch work 353 hours fewer than Americans every year and almost 70% of Dutch women work (compared to the OECD average of 57%). This is up from 35% in the 1980s, although many women work only part time.

Meanwhile, the U.S. — the only OECD country without a national paid parental leave policy — has seen female employment drop over the past 10 years, according to OECD.

By the numbers: OECD looks at the percentage of workers who work long hours as well as the average time spent on leisure or personal activities — including eating and sleeping — in order to determine work-life balance.

  • The French spend the most time on leisure and personal care, with an average of 16.36 hours per day, while people in Turkey and Mexico spend the least at fewer than 13 hours per day.
  • Turkey and Mexico also have the two highest percentages of workers who work long hours at 33% and 29%.
  • More than 16% of male workers in OECD countries work long hours — 50 or more per week — compared to only 8% of women. But women are also more likely to work part-time.
  • Almost 26% of employed women in 2015 had part-time jobs, compared to only 9% of men.
  • Female employment is lowest in Turkey, Greece and Mexico.