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Photo: Ronny Hartmann/picture alliance via Getty Images

Amazon has hired an average of 1,400 new employees per day since the beginning of the year, the New York Times reports.

By the numbers: The tech giant added 427,300 employees between January and October, bringing its total workforce to 1.2 million globally, up more than 50% year-over-year.

  • Since July, Amazon has hired nearly 2,800 employees a day, per the NYT.
  • These numbers do not include the temporary 100,000 holiday workers nor the 500,000 contract delivery drivers.

The big picture: Amazon has benefitted from the pandemic as consumers shift their spending online.

  • The company's revenue grew 37% from last year's. Despite an estimated $2.5 billion in COVID-related costs, its profits reaching $6.3 billion.
    • Amazon said the costs cover onboarding new hires, social distancing, extended breaks, cleaning, supplies and testing.

Go deeper

Dollar General will pay staff to get COVID-19 vaccine

Photo: Jeremy Hogan/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Dollar General is offering four hours of pay to its 157,000 employees if they get a coronavirus vaccine, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Why it matters: The company is one of the first major retailers to incentivize its employees to receive the vaccine. Stores and businesses that have frontline workers are currently vying for accelerated access to vaccines — hoping that early inoculation could boost customer confidence.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
Jan 13, 2021 - Economy & Business

The age of wartime CEOs

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

In the last year, Americans have worked through a deadly pandemic, social isolation, racial injustice protests, a presidential election and, now, an insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.

Why it matters: Laboring through this string of crises is exacerbating employee burnout and pushing CEOs to turn into wartime leaders.

42 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Biden's latest executive order: Buy American

President Joe R. Biden speaks about the economy before signing executive orders in the State Dining Room at the White House on Friday, Jan 22, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

President Joe Biden will continue his flurry of executive orders on Monday, signing a new directive to require the federal government to “buy American” for products and services.

Why it matters: The executive action is yet another attempt by Biden to accomplish goals administratively without waiting for the backing of Congress. The new order echoes Biden's $400 billion campaign pledge to increase government purchases of American goods.