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Amazon has removed downloadable plans for 3D-printed guns from its site, explaining the material violates its content guidelines, CNN reports.

The details: The Seattle-based e-commerce company said it removed the $20 book, "The Liberator Code Book: An Exercise in the Freedom of Speech," which appeared on its website earlier this month. But the author, CJ Awelow, is fighting back claiming that "code is speech," and and explains "proceeds will be used to fight for free speech and the right to bear arms."

The backdrop: Amazon's move comes on the heels of an ongoing multi-state court challenge against the Trump administration, which allowed Defense Distributed, a Texas-based pro-gun group, to publish the files online. The suit, led by Washington, said the undetectable 3D-printed firearms are a threat to public safety and that terrorists could use the plastic weapons to evade detection.

What's happening: As challengers are seeking a permanent nationwide injunction to block the public from downloading the blueprints, private companies like Amazon are making their own decisions.

  • Facebook earlier this month announced that websites hosting downloadable files for 3D-printed guns are prohibited from using its platform.
  • Some leading 3D-printing companies are using gun-blocking software to prevent people from printing guns, NPR reports.
  • Pennsylvania officials had won a temporary agreement last month to bar its residents from downloading the plans.

In response to Amazon’s move, Defense Distributed tweeted late Wednesday: "Sadly the book has been taken off of Amazons webstore. This is [once] again a huge blow to our first amendment. If you want change, act now."

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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

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  2. Education: Schools face an uphill battle to reopen during the pandemic.
  3. Vaccine: Florida requiring proof of residency to get vaccine — CDC extends interval between vaccine doses for exceptional cases.
  4. World: Hong Kong puts tens of thousands on lockdown as cases surge — Pfizer to supply 40 million vaccine doses to lower-income countries — Brazil begins distributing AstraZeneca vaccine.
  5. Sports: 2021 Tokyo Olympics hang in the balance.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck.

DOJ: Capitol rioter threatened to "assassinate" Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Supporters of former President Trump storm the U.S. Captiol on Jan. 6. Photo: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

A Texas man who has been charged with storming the U.S. Capitol in the deadly Jan. 6 siege posted death threats against Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), the Department of Justice said.

The big picture: Garret Miller faces five charges in connection to the riot by supporters of former President Trump, including violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds and making threats. According to court documents, Miller posted violent threats online the day of the siege, including tweeting “Assassinate AOC.”

Schumer calls for IG probe into alleged plan by Trump, DOJ lawyer to oust acting AG

Jeffrey Clark speaks next to Deputy US Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen at a news conference in October. Photo: Yuri Gripas/AFP via Getty Images.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) on Saturday called for the Justice Department inspector general to investigate an alleged plan by former President Trump and a DOJ lawyer to remove the acting attorney general and replace him with someone more willing to investigate unfounded claims of election fraud.

Driving the news: The New York Times first reported Friday that the lawyer, Jeffrey Clark, allegedly devised "ways to cast doubt on the election results and to bolster Mr. Trump’s continuing legal battles and the pressure on Georgia politicians. Because Mr. [Jeffrey] Rosen had refused the president’s entreaties to carry out those plans, Mr. Trump was about to decide whether to fire Mr. Rosen and replace him with Mr. Clark."