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Photo: MAXIM ZMEYEV/AFP via Getty Images)

Russia’s prison service has ordered opposition leader Alexei Navalny to return to Moscow by Tuesday morning or face jail if he returns past the deadline, Reuters reports.

The state of play: Navalny, one of Russia's most prominent critics of President Vladimir Putin, has been in Germany since he was airlifted there while recovering from an attempted poisoning attempt.

  • An investigation by the website Bellingcat found this month that Navalny was tailed by a chemical weapons team from Russia's Federal Security Service (FSB) before his poisoning.
  • Last week, it was revealed that Navalny had duped one of the FSB agents accused of tailing him into detailing on a phone call how the botched operation was carried out. The Kremlin has denied having any role in the poisoning and claims it hasn't seen evidence Navalny was poisoned.

Details: The Federal Prison Service (FSIN) on Monday accused Navalny of violating the terms of a suspended prison term he has been serving since 2014 for a theft case he claims was politically motivated.

  • Navalny's lawyer said there is no way he can return to Moscow by Tuesday and accused the FSIN of acting on the orders of the Kremlin, per Reuters.
  • Navalny has been arrested several times for his anti-government protests. His probation period expires on Dec. 30.

Go deeper: Russian security officer duped into revealing poisoning plot to Navalny

Go deeper

How the far right made itself a Russian intel target

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The bizarre story of Capitol rioter Riley June Williams is a full-circle moment for Russia as it looks for new ways to shore up its own influence by fueling the democracy-destabilizing ascendancy of a globally networked radical right.

The big picture: Five years ago, Russia used a network of bots and strategic hack-and-leak operations to embolden an unwitting U.S. far right. Now, at least one American extremist stands accused of willingly offering would-be material support to Moscow.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
29 mins ago - Economy & Business

Scoop: Red Sox strike out on deal to go public

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The parent company of the Boston Red Sox and Liverpool F.C. has ended talks to sell a minority ownership stake to RedBall Acquisition, a SPAC formed by longtime baseball executive Billy Beane and investor Gerry Cardinale, Axios has learned from multiple sources. An alternative investment, structured more like private equity, remains possible.

Why it matters: Red Sox fans won't be able to buy stock in the team any time soon.