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Photo: Getty Images/Patrick Foto

As personal devices become the centerpiece of in-flight entertainment, airline passengers are increasingly at odds over the use of window shades, the Wall Street Journal writes.

The big picture: Passengers and airlines say the increased use of devices such as iPads and phones has boosted the desire for darkness. Outdoor light — especially when bouncing off clouds or ice — causes glare that can make it harder to view screens.

  • Many daytime flights have begun to travel in the dark, with some Boeing 787 flights disabling individual controls to keep windows dimmed throughout — and flights from Asia to North America often block passenger control entirely.

The other side: Many want the shades kept open to enjoy the view, gain reading light or keep one's internal clock in check.

  • Some customers who favor light complain that pressure from seat mates or controlled windows make them feel cheated from their window-seat experience.
  • Delta says it's even had to address customer conflicts over window light, which they resolve by relocating passengers into areas of the plane favoring dark or light.

The bottom line: Window seats were once coveted for their view. Now, they're a matter of power, thanks to technology's ever-growing influence on our lives.

Go deeper: Airlines on track to devalue frequent flyer miles

Go deeper

Dave Lawler, author of World
1 min ago - World

Latin America turns to China and Russia for COVID-19 vaccines

Several countries in the Americas have received their first vaccine shipments over the past few weeks — not from the regional superpower or from Western pharmaceutical giants, but from China, Russia, and in some cases India.

Why it matters: North and South America have been battered by the pandemic and recorded several of the world’s highest death tolls. Few countries other than the U.S. have the capacity to manufacture vaccines at scale, and most lack the resources to buy their way to the front of the line for imports. That’s led to a scramble for whatever supply is available.

More schools are reopening in the U.S.

Students settle into a classroom in New York City. Photo: Michael Loccisano/Getty Images

More than 72% of K-12 students are now attending schools that offer in-person or hybrid models of learning.

The big picture: The U.S. is seeing an almost-universal return of schools that were in-person as of November, as well as a gradual return in parts of the country that had been virtual for almost a year.

The manufacturing boom's bottleneck

llustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

The manufacturing sector has bounced back from its pandemic knockout. But as the economy reopens, factories can't keep up with orders.

Why it matters: The materials manufacturers need are hard to find and prices for them are soaring.