Photo: Getty Images/Patrick Foto

As personal devices become the centerpiece of in-flight entertainment, airline passengers are increasingly at odds over the use of window shades, the Wall Street Journal writes.

The big picture: Passengers and airlines say the increased use of devices such as iPads and phones has boosted the desire for darkness. Outdoor light — especially when bouncing off clouds or ice — causes glare that can make it harder to view screens.

  • Many daytime flights have begun to travel in the dark, with some Boeing 787 flights disabling individual controls to keep windows dimmed throughout — and flights from Asia to North America often block passenger control entirely.

The other side: Many want the shades kept open to enjoy the view, gain reading light or keep one's internal clock in check.

  • Some customers who favor light complain that pressure from seat mates or controlled windows make them feel cheated from their window-seat experience.
  • Delta says it's even had to address customer conflicts over window light, which they resolve by relocating passengers into areas of the plane favoring dark or light.

The bottom line: Window seats were once coveted for their view. Now, they're a matter of power, thanks to technology's ever-growing influence on our lives.

Go deeper: Airlines on track to devalue frequent flyer miles

Go deeper

Trump commutes Roger Stone's sentence

Roger Stone arriving at his sentencing hearing on Feb. 20. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump on Friday evening commuted the sentence of his longtime associate Roger Stone, according to two senior administration officials. Stone in February was sentenced to 40 months in prison for crimes including obstruction, witness tampering and making false statements to Congress.

Why it matters: The controversial move brings an abrupt end to the possibility of Stone spending time behind bars. He had been scheduled to report to prison on July 14.

Updated 8 hours ago - Health

Which states have set single-day coronavirus records this week

Data: COVID Tracking Project and state health department data compiled by Axios; Map: Danielle Alberti and Naema Ahmed/Axios

13 states this week surpassed records set just last week for their highest number of coronavirus infections in a single day, according to the COVID Tracking Project and state health department data. 16 states in total reported new highs.

The big picture: The United States' alarming rise in coronavirus cases isn't just due to increased testing — particularly where the number of cases has grown fastest over the last month, Axios' Andrew Witherspoon and Caitlin Owens report.

Updated 8 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 6:30 p.m. ET: 12,389,660 — Total deaths: 557,279 — Total recoveries — 6,830,596Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 6:30 p.m. ET: 3,169,611 — Total deaths: 133,885 — Total recoveries: 983,185 — Total tested: 38,856,341Map.
  3. Public health: The reality of the coronavirus bites.
  4. Trade: Trump says he's no longer considering phase-two trade deal with China because the pandemic damaged the two countries' relationship.
  5. 🎧 Podcast: Rural America has its own coronavirus problem.