Photo: Getty Images/Patrick Foto

As personal devices become the centerpiece of in-flight entertainment, airline passengers are increasingly at odds over the use of window shades, the Wall Street Journal writes.

The big picture: Passengers and airlines say the increased use of devices such as iPads and phones has boosted the desire for darkness. Outdoor light — especially when bouncing off clouds or ice — causes glare that can make it harder to view screens.

  • Many daytime flights have begun to travel in the dark, with some Boeing 787 flights disabling individual controls to keep windows dimmed throughout — and flights from Asia to North America often block passenger control entirely.

The other side: Many want the shades kept open to enjoy the view, gain reading light or keep one's internal clock in check.

  • Some customers who favor light complain that pressure from seat mates or controlled windows make them feel cheated from their window-seat experience.
  • Delta says it's even had to address customer conflicts over window light, which they resolve by relocating passengers into areas of the plane favoring dark or light.

The bottom line: Window seats were once coveted for their view. Now, they're a matter of power, thanks to technology's ever-growing influence on our lives.

Go deeper: Airlines on track to devalue frequent flyer miles

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Spotify has a Joe Rogan dilemma

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Spotify is getting slammed for allowing Joe Rogan, one of its most popular podcasters, to host far-right conspiracy theorist Alex Jones on his show.

Why it matters: The company, which still distributes mostly music, will begin to encounter more of these types of problems as it expands its podcast business.

Coronavirus cases are at an all-time high ahead of Election Day

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Data: The COVID Tracking Project, state health departments; Map: Andrew Witherspoon, Sara Wise/Axios

In the final week before Election Day, new coronavirus infections have soared to an all-time high — virtually guaranteeing that the pandemic will be the most prominent issue in America as voters prepare to choose the next president.

The big picture: Cases are surging and local hospitals are straining at the very moment that voters are choosing between President Trump, who continues to insist that the pandemic is almost over, and Joe Biden, who has made the crisis a centerpiece of his campaign.

Biden's closing ad campaign

Joe Biden attends a virtual town hall event with Oprah Winfrey at The Queen theater in Delaware. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Joe Biden's team is spending tens of millions of dollars on a national digital ad campaign in the final days before Election Day — but highlighting a plethora of voters from Pennsylvania in particular, underscoring how critically important the state is.

Why it matters: Biden's team is betting that COVID-19 is on the ballot, and amplifying the stories of those affected by the pandemic with an emphasis on persuading voters in key battlegrounds to support the former VP.