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I wrote the first two sentences in italics below — they're from a story we published in Monday's Axios Future newsletter. Then, a new computer program created at OpenAI wrote the rest, on the first try.

  • We added bolding and bullet points to mimic Axios style, but didn't change the computer-generated text at all.
  • A very important note: Everything you'll read below, after the italicized intro — quotes, "facts" and all — is not true. The AI program invented them.
  • Go deeper: Learn more about the OpenAI prose-mimicking program

On the heels of a sweeping new U.S. plan to retain dominance in artificial intelligence, the Pentagon has cast Chinese development of intelligent weapons as an existential threat to the international order.

A day after the release of an executive order by President Trump that omits naming China, the Defense Department, in a new AI strategy document, speaks in stark terms of a "destabilizing" Chinese threat.

It warns of a "new arms race in AI" and says the United States "will not sit idly by" as a "highly advanced new generation of weapons capable of waging asymmetric warfare" is "possessed by aggressive actors."

Related: New White House plan on China may spark a cyber arms race

"China uses new and innovative methods to enable its advanced military technology to proliferate around the world, particularly to countries with which we have strategic partnerships," the Pentagon said in its five-page strategy outline last week.

The new U.S. strategy will be a major component of the White House's first National Security Strategy, coming in two parts in September.

  • The first part, which Trump wants to roll out in full by June, is a much more traditional geopolitical playbook focused on the threats posed by China and Russia.
  • The second part of the NSS is "a broad review of all U.S. national security interests, and the potential new relationships needed for those interests," the document said.

"The President has directed me to undertake a study of our strategy toward a world of artificial intelligence," Defense Secretary James Mattis told the Senate Armed Services Committee on Thursday.

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Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12 p.m. ET: 12,772,755 — Total deaths: 566,036 — Total recoveries — 7,030,749Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12 p.m. ET: 3,269,531 — Total deaths: 134,898 — Total recoveries: 995,576 — Total tested: 39,553,395Map.
  3. Politics: Trump wears face mask in public for first time.
  4. States: Florida smashes single-day record for new coronavirus cases with over 15,000.
  5. Public health: Trump's coronavirus testing czar says lockdowns in hotspots "should be on the table" — We're losing the war on the coronavirus.
  6. Education: Betsy DeVos says schools that don't reopen shouldn't get federal funds — Pelosi accuses Trump of "messing with the health of our children."
2 hours ago - Health

Florida smashes single-day record for new coronavirus cases

Data: Covid Tracking Project; Chart: Axios Visuals

Florida reported 15,299 confirmed coronavirus cases on Sunday — a new single-day record for any state, according to its health department.

The big picture: The figure shatters both Florida's previous record of 11,458 new cases and the single-state record of 11,694 set by California last week, according to AP. It also surpasses New York's daily peak of 11,571 new cases in April, and comes just a day after Disney World reopened in Orlando.

Pelosi: Trump is "messing with the health of our children" with push to open schools

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday that Education Secretary Betsy DeVos' aggressive push to fully reopen schools this fall is "malfeasance and dereliction of duty," accusing the Trump administration of "messing with the health of our children."

Why it matters: Trump has demanded that schools reopen as part of his efforts to juice the economy by allowing parents to return to work, despite caution from health officials that little is known about how the virus impacts children.