Jan 21, 2020

Supreme Court won't fast-track Affordable Care Act case

Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

The Supreme Court said Monday that it won't speed up a lawsuit that aims to strike down the entire Affordable Care Act. The law's defenders had asked the high court to step in earlier than usual, but the justices opted to let the normal appeals process run its course instead.

Why it matters: This unsurprising move all but ensures that the court won't decide the ACA's fate until after the 2020 presidential election. If the justices ultimately do strike down all or part of the health care law, President Trump won't have to answer for the ensuing disruption during a campaign — and it could end up being his successor's mess to clean up.

Go deeper: The ACA legal fight isn't even close to over

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Trump's selective urgency at the Supreme Court

Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

The Trump administration has consistently tried to get controversial cases in front of the Supreme Court as quickly as possible — but not when that might have meant striking down the entire Affordable Care Act before the 2020 election.

Why it matters: Trump’s Justice Department has tried to leapfrog the traditional process far more than its predecessors did, and at least one Supreme Court justice seems to be worried that it’s affecting the court’s work.

Go deeperArrowJan 23, 2020

Appeals court rules against Trump's Medicaid work requirements

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Trump administration violated federal law by allowing red states to impose work requirements on their Medicaid programs, a federal appeals court ruled Friday. The court said the administration had not properly justified its decision, and that it was out of step with Medicaid's statutory goals.

What's next: The most likely next step is an appeal to the Supreme Court. In the meantime, the administration has not won a single favorable ruling in lawsuits over what had once looked like one of its most significant health care policies.

California's Affordable Care Act coverage experiment

Photo: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

Covered California, the state's Affordable Care Act exchange, announced yesterday that new enrollment rose 41% in 2020 after the state reinstated the individual mandate and expanded the law's insurance subsidies.

Why it matters: If California is acting as a real-life test case for what happens when policymakers beef up the ACA, the experiment seems to be going well, at least in terms of coverage numbers.

Go deeperArrowFeb 19, 2020 - Health