More people are signing up for ACA coverage due to coronavirus layoffs. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The number of people who lost jobs and related health coverage and then signed up for Affordable Care Act health plans on the federal website was up 46% this year compared with 2019, representing an increase of 154,000 people, the federal government said in a new report.

The bottom line: The rush of people going to HealthCare.gov was tied to "job losses due to COVID-19," the government said.

Yes, but: Medicaid enrollment due to coronavirus-related job losses appears to be growing even faster than enrollment in ACA plans, according to the Georgetown University Health Policy Institute.

Go deeper: Medicaid will be a coronavirus lifeline

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Updated 9 hours ago - Health

World coronavirus updates: Global cases top 18 million

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Axios Visuals

The number of novel coronavirus cases surged past 18 million globally on Sunday night, Johns Hopkins data shows.

By the numbers: More than 688,300 people have died from COVID-19 worldwide. Over 10.6 million have recovered.

Scoop: White House launches regional media push to COVID hot spots

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

To show President Trump's "renewed focus" on combating COVID-19, the White House is launching a heavy regional media campaign in states that are coronavirus hot spots to educate the public on the importance of following mitigation measures, White House officials tell Axios.

Driving the news: The White House will be blanketing designated marketing areas throughout the Southwest and Midwest with White House doctors and administration officials on air.

It's not over when the vaccine arrives

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

The first coronavirus vaccine may arrive soon, but it’s unlikely to be the knockout punch you may be hoping for.

Why it matters: The end of this global pandemic almost certainly rests with a vaccine. Experts caution, however, that it’s important to have realistic expectations about how much the first vaccines across the finish line will — and won’t — be able to accomplish.