AP

The news moves quickly in Trumpworld, so people are already focused on who could replace James Comey as FBI director after his abrupt firing yesterday evening. Here are a few possible replacements:

Rudy Giuliani

The former New York mayor and U.S. attorney is reportedly on Trump's shortlist to replace Comey. A source close to Trump confirmed to NY Mag's Olivia Nuzzi that Giuliani is being considered for FBI director. However, before that tip, Giuliani told Nuzzi and The Atlantic's Rosie Gray: "I am not. I'm not a candidate for FBI director. The president's not gonna ask me, and I'm not gonna be FBI director."

Giuliani was in D.C. last night, having drinks at Trump International Hotel. When asked if he'll be meeting with the president today, he said, "If I am, I wouldn't say."

Chris Christie

The New Jersey governor is not without controversies of his own, but he was one of the first Republicans to endorse Trump in 2016. Earlier this year, Trump appointed Christie to lead his opioid and drug abuse commission.

Andrew McCabe

McCabe is currently serving as the acting FBI director in Comey's absence. He has been Comey's deputy since Feb. 2016 and has worked on various issues like interrogation, counterterrorism, and national security. His biggest setback: His close ties to Comey and his participation in the Russia investigation and Clinton email investigation, which was cited as the reason for Comey's termination.

Mike Rogers

He's a former FBI agent and the former Republican House Intelligence Committee chairman. Before Comey's confirmation in 2013, Rogers was the FBI Agents Association's top recommendation to serve as FBI director. His name could resurface in discussions about Comey's replacement.

Ken Wainstein

Another favorite was Wainstein, who's got a lot of credentials:

  • Former head of the Justice Department's National Security Division
  • Former general counsel of the FBI
  • Once served as the chief federal prosecutor in D.C. when he served in the Justice Department
  • Also served as the director of the Executive Office of U.S. Attorneys
  • Served as former FBI director Robert Mueller's chief of staff
  • During the May 6 Senate hearing on the Russia investigation, he acted as counsel to former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper.
Ray Kelly

Another New Yorker, he's the former commissioner of the NYPD and he was considered for the FBI Director role under Bill Clinton in 1993. Although he didn't get the job, Kelly was selected as Under Secretary for Terrorism and Financial Intelligence at Treasury and commissioner of the U.S. Customs Service for the Clinton administration.

Trey Gowdy

The South Carolina Republican served on the Trump transition team's executive committee. One thing Trump will surely find appealing: Gowdy led House committee investigation of Clinton's actions surrounding the deaths of four Americans in Benghazi when she was Secretary of State. He openly criticized Comey for his decision not to prosecute Clinton over the emails.

Go deeper

Updated 28 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: Chris Christie: Wear a mask "or you may regret it — as I did"
  2. Senate Democrats block vote on McConnell's targeted COVID relief bill
  3. Economy: Why the stimulus delay isn't a crisis (yet).
  4. Health: New York reports most COVID cases since MayStudies show drop in coronavirus death rate
  5. Education: San Francisco public schools likely won't reopen before the end of the year.
  6. World: Spain becomes first nation in Western Europe to exceed 1 million cases — France becomes the second
Updated 5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

U.S. officials: Iran and Russia aim to interfere in election

Iran and Russia have obtained voter registration information that can be used to undermine confidence in the U.S. election system, Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe announced at a press conference Wednesday evening.

Why it matters: The revelation comes roughly two weeks before Election Day. Ratcliffe said Iran has sent threatening emails to Democratic voters this week in states across the U.S. and spread videos claiming that people can vote more than once.

Updated 6 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Supreme Court blocks Alabama curbside voting measure

Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The Supreme Court on Wednesday evening blocked a lower court order that would have allowed voters to cast ballots curbside at Alabama polling places on Election Day.

Whit it matters: With less than two weeks until Election Day, the justices voted 5-3 to reinstate the curbside voting ban and overturn a lower court judge's ruling designed to protect people with disabilities during the coronavirus pandemic.