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Photo: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

More than 3,500 Amazon employees have signed a demand letter to develop a detailed climate plan based on the e-commerce giant's current and future environmental impacts, outlining 6 demands to reduce their collective carbon footprint.

Our thought bubble: The letter, including the criticism of Amazon’s services for oil companies, underscores the complicated relationship between Big Tech and climate change, per Axios' Ben Geman. Tech giants have been some of the biggest players driving the growth in corporate renewable power procurement and making sustainability commitments.

But, but, but: They also have large carbon footprints from powering data centers, manufacturing and, in Amazon’s case, deliveries. And Amazon isn’t the only Big Tech company working with the oil and gas industry.

In late February, ExxonMobil announced a partnership with Microsoft in cloud technology and data aimed at helping boost production in the Permian Basin region. A recent story in Gizmodo, which is cited in the Amazon workers’ letter, delves into services that Google, Amazon and other tech firms provide to oil companies.

The big picture: A glaring difference about this movement, compared to Google's sexual harassment walkout last year, is that Amazon workers posted their names alongside criticisms of the employer, a rarity in the tech industry, the New York Times reports. The post is the largest employee-based call to action on climate change in the tech industry to date.

  • Flashback: In December 2018, only 16 Amazon employee shareholders asked the board of directors for a resolution to address climate change.

Read their requests here.

Amazon's statement:

“Earlier this year, we announced that we will share our company-wide carbon footprint, along with related goals and programs. ... Our dedication to ensuring that our customers understand how we are addressing environmental issues has been unwavering – we look forward to launching more work and sharing more this year. ... We have a long term commitment to powering our global infrastructure using 100% renewable energy.”

Go deeper: Google staff walkout protests sexual harassment

Go deeper

Updated 50 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Dave Lawler, author of World
1 hour ago - World

Biden holds first phone call with Putin, raises Navalny arrest

Putin takes a call in 2017. Photo: Handout/Anadolu Agency/Getty

President Biden on Tuesday held his first call since taking office with Vladimir Putin, pressing the Russian president on the arrest of opposition leader Alexey Navalny and the Russia-linked hack on U.S. government agencies.

The state of play: Biden also raised arms control, bounties allegedly placed on U.S. troops in Afghanistan and the war in Ukraine, according to a White House readout. The statement said Biden and Putin agreed maintain "consistent communication," and that Biden stressed the U.S. would "act firmly in defense of its national interests in response to actions by Russia that harm us or our allies."

Biden signs racial equity executive orders

Joe Biden prays at Grace Lutheran Church in Kenosha, Wisconsin, on September 3, 2020, in the aftermath of the police shooting of Jacob Blake. PHOTO: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

President Joe Biden on Tuesday signed executive orders on housing and ending the Justice Department's use of private prisons as part of what the White House is calling his “racial equity agenda.”

The big picture: Biden needs the support of Congress to push through police reform or new voting rights legislation. The executive orders serve as his down payment to immediately address systemic racism while he focuses on the pandemic.