Apr 8, 2024 - Science

In photos: Solar eclipse crosses the U.S.

A woman watches the eclipse on April 8 from Mazatlan, Mexico. Photo: Hector Vivas/Getty Images

Heads turned up as Monday's rare total solar eclipse passed across the skies over U.S.

The big picture: Almost everyone in the U.S. was able to view the celestial event to some extent.

The moon begins to eclipse the sun during the total solar eclipse in Mazatlan, Sinaloa state, Mexico on April 8, 2024. This year's path of totality is 115 miles (185 kilometers) wide and home to nearly 32 million Americans, with an additional 150 million living less than 200 miles from the strip. The next total solar eclipse that can be seen from a large part of North America won't come around until 2044. (Photo by MARIO VAZQUEZ / AFP) (Photo by MARIO VAZQUEZ/AFP via Getty Images)
The Moon begins to eclipse the Sun during the total solar eclipse in Mazatlan, Sinaloa state, Mexico, on April 8. Photo: Mario Vazquez/AFP via Getty Images
The moon eclipses the sun during the total solar eclipse in Mazatlan, Sinaloa State, Mexico on April 8, 2024. Eclipse mania gripped North America on Monday as a breathtaking celestial spectacle set to be witnessed by tens of millions of people offered a rare convergence of commercial and scientific opportunities -- and an excuse to party. The Moon's shadow plunged the Pacific coast of Mexico into total darkness at 11:07 am local time (1807 GMT) and was sweeping across the United States, before returning to the ocean over Canada's Atlantic coast just under an hour-and-a-half after landfall. (Photo by MARIO VAZQUEZ / AFP) (Photo by MARIO VAZQUEZ/AFP via Getty Images)
The Moon eclipses the Sun during the total solar eclipse in Mazatlan, Sinaloa State, Mexico, on April 8. Photo: Mario Vazquez/AFP via Getty Images
 The diamond ring effect is seen as the moon eclipses the sun on April 8, 2024 in Fort Worth, Texas. Millions of people have flocked to areas across North America that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse. During the event, the moon will pass in between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun. (Photo by Ron Jenkins/Getty Images)
The diamond ring effect is seen as the Moon eclipses the Sun on April 8 from Fort Worth, Texas. Photo: Ron Jenkins/Getty Images
People view the start of the total eclipse on the campus of Southern Illinois University on April 08, 2024 in Carbondale, Illinois. People have travelled from around the country to the campus to view the rare celestial phenomenon. Cities around the country that are in the path of totality are experiencing a similar influx of tourists. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
People view the start of the total eclipse on the campus of Southern Illinois University. Many travelled from around the country to the campus to view the rare celestial phenomenon. Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images
CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS - APRIL 08: People prepare for the start of the total eclipse on the campus of Southern Illinois University on April 08, 2024 in Carbondale, Illinois. People have travelled from around the country to the campus to view the rare celestial phenomenon. Cities around the country that are in the path of totality are experiencing a similar influx of tourists. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
A child prepares for the start of the total eclipse on the campus of Southern Illinois University, which is in the path of totality. Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images
A man looks toward the sky at the 'Edge at Hudson Yards' observation deck during a total solar eclipse across North America, in New York City on April 8, 2024. This year's path of totality is 115 miles (185 kilometers) wide and home to nearly 32 million Americans, with an additional 150 million living less than 200 miles from the strip. The next total solar eclipse that can be seen from a large part of North America won't come around until 2044. (Photo by Charly TRIBALLEAU / AFP) (Photo by CHARLY TRIBALLEAU/AFP via Getty Images)
A man looks toward the sky at the 'Edge at Hudson Yards' observation deck in New York City during a total solar eclipse on April 8. Photo: Charly Triballeau / AFP via Getty Images
People look up at the sun during a total solar eclipse across North America, at Niagara Falls State Park in Niagara Falls, New York, on April 8, 2024. This year's path of totality is 115 miles (185 kilometers) wide and home to nearly 32 million Americans, with an additional 150 million living less than 200 miles from the strip. The next total solar eclipse that can be seen from a large part of North America won't come around until 2044. (Photo by ANGELA WEISS / AFP) (Photo by ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images)
People look up at the Sun during a total solar eclipse from Niagara Falls State Park in New York. Photo: Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images
A man views the total solar eclipse at Niagara Falls State Park in Niagara Falls, New York, on April 8, 2024. This year's path of totality is 115 miles (185 kilometers) wide and home to nearly 32 million Americans, with an additional 150 million living less than 200 miles from the strip. The next total solar eclipse that can be seen from a large part of North America won't come around until 2044. (Photo by ANGELA WEISS / AFP) (Photo by ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images)
A man views the total solar eclipse at Niagara Falls State Park on April 8. Photo: Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images
The sky darkens as people look up at the sun during the total solar eclipse across North America, at Niagara Falls State Park in Niagara Falls, New York, on April 8, 2024. This year's path of totality is 115 miles (185 kilometers) wide and home to nearly 32 million Americans, with an additional 150 million living less than 200 miles from the strip. The next total solar eclipse that can be seen from a large part of North America won't come around until 2044. (Photo by ANGELA WEISS / AFP) (Photo by ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images)
The sky darkens as people look up at the Sun during the total solar eclipse from Niagara Falls State Park. Photo: Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images
A bride and groom view the solar eclipse amid a darkened sky after marrying at a mass wedding at the Total Eclipse of the Heart festival on April 8, 2024 in Russellville, Arkansas. Millions of people have flocked to areas across North America that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse. During the event, the moon will pass in between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
A bride and groom view the solar eclipse amid a darkened sky after marrying at a mass wedding at the Total Eclipse of the Heart festival on April 8 in Russellville, Arkansas. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images
People watch the total eclipse at Cristo de Las Noas on April 08, 2024 in Torreon, Mexico. Millions of people have flocked to areas across North America that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse. During the event, the moon will pass in between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun. (Photo by Saul Perales/Getty Images)
People watch the total eclipse at Cristo de Las Noas on April 8 in Torreon, Mexico. Photo: Saul Perales/Getty Images

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