Jun 27, 2022 - Politics & Policy

Democrats bet on Roe's ballot power

Thousands of demonstrators pack Union Square Park in Manhattan on Friday.
Thousands of demonstrators pack Union Square Park in Manhattan on Friday. Photo: Frank Becerra Jr./The (Westchester) Journal News via USA Today Network

Democrats are grabbing the Roe reversal as a lifeline ahead of November's midterms. Republicans want to keep talking about inflation.

Why it matters: This is an unusual case in which the losing side wants to talk all about it. The winning side wants the spotlight elsewhere.

Axios got a first look at websites that Democrats' House and Senate campaign arms launched Monday — less than 72 hours after the Supreme Court ruling — blasting GOP candidates' abortion records.

  • Democrats see it as a mobilizing issue for suburban women in swing House districts across the country.
  • The House Democratic (DCCC) site is called "Extreme GOP."
  • The Senate Democrats' (DSCC) site is: "This is the GOP on Abortion."

Republicans know the issue could hurt them with those very same voters, so they will try to keep slamming President Biden on pocketbook issues, Axios' Lachlan Markay reports.

  • Samantha Bullock of the House Republicans' campaign arm (NRCC) said: "This ruling does nothing to change the fact that voters' top concerns are rising prices, soaring crime and the disaster at the southern border."

Two polls released in the past 24 hours give Democrats hope the issue will move voters.

  • A CBS News/YouGov poll of 1,591 adults found 50% of Democrats were more likely to vote based on the Roe ruling, while only 20% of Republicans said the same.
  • In an NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll out this morning (941 adults), 78% of Democrats said the court's decision makes them more likely to vote this fall — 24 points higher than Republicans.
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