Apr 10, 2021 - Health

Working-age, young Latinos face disproportionately high COVID death rates in U.S.

Ricardo "El Profe" Castorena, right, of the non-profit Binational of Central California, gives a mask to a farmworker in the fields of Selma last December.
Ricardo "El Profe" Castorena, right, of the non-profit Binational of Central California, gives a mask to a farmworker in the fields of Selma last December. Photo: Genaro Molina/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Working-age and young Latinos face disproportionately high COVID-19 death rates as states move toward reopening. Foreign-born Latinos who work essential or front-line jobs are especially in peril.

The big picture: A foreign-born Latino worker in California is 11.6 times more likely to died from COVID-19 than any other non-Hispanic U.S.-born group, according to a new USC study.

The bottom line: The imbalances highlight the urgent need for vaccination campaigns to directly reach a population that is overrepresented in industries many depend on, like agriculture and food processing.

  • Organizations like Planned Parenthood and United Farm Workers have launched grassroots projects to vaccinate people of color who are front-line workers.
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