Updated Jul 9, 2019

Trump admin steps up push to add citizenship question to 2020 Census

Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Attorney General Bill Barr told AP Monday he can see a legal avenue for adding a citizenship question to the 2020 Census, but he declined to reveal details of the Trump administration's strategy.

Why it matters: It's the latest indication that the Trump administration is stepping up legal efforts to add the question to the 2020 Census, after the Supreme Court temporarily blocked the move. The Justice Department said Sunday a new team of government lawyers was taking over the push to include the question, per the Wall Street Journal.

The big picture: A senior official told AP that President Trump is "expected to issue a memorandum to the Commerce Department instructing it to include the question on census forms." Trump has said he's considering issuing an executive order to add the citizenship question to the 2020 Census.

  • Acting U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services director Ken Cuccinelli told "Fox News Sunday" that Trump is "determined ... to have it roll forward in the 2020 Census."

This article has been updated with Barr's comments.

Go deeper: Trump publicly weighs executive order on citizenship question

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House votes to hold Barr and Ross in criminal contempt

Wilbur Ross looks on as William Barr delivers remarks on citizenship and the 2020 Census on July 11. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

The House voted 230-198 to hold Attorney General William Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in criminal contempt of Congress on Wednesday for withholding subpoenaed materials related to the failed 2020 Census citizenship question.

Why it matters: Democrats believe the administration's reason for attempting to add a citizenship question to the 2020 Census is "a cover for a politically motivated attempt to eliminate noncitizens from population statistics ... [thereby] diminishing Democratic power," the NYT reports. Wednesday's vote follows a House Oversight Committee decision last month.

Go deeperArrowJul 17, 2019

Census case judge blocks DOJ bid to switch legal teams

Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

A federal judge hearing lawsuits in New York concerning the Trump administration's attempt to include a citizenship question in the 2020 Census said Tuesday it can't switch legal teams without providing "satisfactory reasons" to do so.

Why it matters: It's another blow for the Trump administration as it pushes to include the question in the 2020 Census. U.S. District Judge Jesse Furman wrote in a court order that the Justice Department's attorney switch plan was "patently deficient."

Go deeperArrowUpdated Jul 10, 2019

DOJ bid to switch legal teams blocked by another Census case judge

The Department of Justice's plan to switch legal teams in its attempt to include a citizenship question in the 2020 Census was rejected by a second judge on Wednesday.

Why it matters: The order handed down by U.S. District Judge George Hazel, who's presiding over a challenge to the Trump administration’s plan in Maryland, is yet another blow for the Trump administration as it pushes to include the question in the 2020 Census.

Go deeperArrowJul 11, 2019