Aug 8, 2018

2018 officially has record number of women nominees

Organizers of the annual women's march. Photo: Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Here's your proof that 2018 is the year of the woman: there are now at least 183 women nominees for U.S. House and 11 women nominees for governor — the highest in history, per the Center for American Women and Politics.

Be smart: Most of the nominees are running as Democrats, which could be a huge advantage for their party come November.

Before this election cycle, 167 women was the record for major party nominees for U.S. House and the previous record for women nominees for governor (10) was set in 1994.

Meet the women who won in August 7 primaries:

  1. Gretchen Whitmer, Democratic nominee for governor in Michigan
  2. Laura Kelly, Democratic nominee for governor in Kansas
  3. Debbie Stabenow, Democratic senator and nominee for re-election in Michigan
  4. Claire McCaskill, Democratic senator and nominee for re-election in Missouri
  5. Maria Cantwell, Democratic senator and nominee for re-election in Washington
  6. Susan Hutchison, Republican nominee for U.S. Senate in Washington
  7. Cathy Albro, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Michigan's 3rd district
  8. Gretchen Driskell, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Michigan's 7th district
  9. Elissa Slotkin, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Michigan's 8th district
  10. Candius Stearns, Republican congresswoman and nominee for re-election in Michigan's 9th district
  11. Kimberly Bizon, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Michigan's 10th district
  12. Haley Stevens, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Michigan's 11th district
  13. Debbie Dingell, Democratic congresswoman and nominee for re-election in Michigan's 12th district
  14. Rashida Tlaib, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Michigan's 13th district, who will be the first Muslim woman elected to Congress.
  15. Brenda Lawrence, Democratic congresswoman and nominee for re-election in Michigan's 14th district
  16. Ann Wagner, Republican congresswoman and nominee for re-election in Missouri's 2nd district
  17. Katy Geppert, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Missouri's 3rd district
  18. Hallie Thompson, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Missouri's 4th district
  19. Vicky Hartzler, Republican congresswoman and nominee for re-election in Missouri's 4th district
  20. Kathy Ellis, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Missouri's 8th district
  21. Sarah Swain, Democratic nominee for Attorney General in Kansas
  22. Sharice Davids, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Kansas' 3rd district
  23. Carolyn Long, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Washington's 3rd district
  24. Suzan DelBene, Democratic congresswoman and nominee for re-election in Washington's 1st district
  25. Christine Brown, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Washington's 4th district
  26. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, Republican congresswoman and nominee for re-election in Washington's 5th district
  27. Lisa Brown, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Washington's 5th district
  28. Pramila Jayapal, Democratic congresswoman and nominee for re-election in Washington's 7th district

One more thing: Tonight's primaries pit two Trump-backed men against Democratic women in November in Michigan's gubernatorial and U.S. Senate races.

This post has been updated with the new record number of women after more primaries were called on Aug. 8,

Go deeper

Trump touts press briefing "ratings" as U.S. coronavirus case surge

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images.

President Trump sent about a half-dozen tweets on Sunday touting the high television ratings that his coronavirus press briefings have received, selectively citing a New York Times article that compared them to "The Bachelor" and "Monday Night Football."

Why it matters: The president has been holding daily press briefings in the weeks since the coronavirus pandemic was declared, but news outlets have struggled with how to cover them live — as Trump has repeatedly been found to spread misinformation and contradict public health officials.

World coronavirus updates: Total cases surge to over 700,000

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens and confirmed plus presumptive cases from the CDC

There are now than more than 700,000 confirmed cases of the coronavirus around the world, according to data from Johns Hopkins. The virus has now killed more than 32,000 people — with Italy alone reporting over 10,000 deaths.

The big picture: Governments around the world have stepped up public health and economic measures to stop the spread of the virus and soften the financial impact. In the U.S., now the site of the largest outbreak in the world, President Trump said Saturday he would issue a "strong" travel advisory for New York, New Jersey and parts of Connecticut.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 48 mins ago - Health

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 2 p.m. ET: 704,095 — Total deaths: 33,509 — Total recoveries: 148,824.
  2. U.S.: Leads the world in cases. Total confirmed cases as of 2 p.m. ET: 132,637 — Total deaths: 2,351 — Total recoveries: 2,612.
  3. Federal government latest: The first federal prisoner to die from coronavirus was reported from a correctional facility in Louisiana on Sunday.
  4. Public health updates: Fauci says 100,000 to 200,000 Americans could die from virus.
  5. State updates: Louisiana governor says state is on track to exceed ventilator capacity by end of this week — Cuomo says Trump's mandatory quarantine comments "really panicked" people
  6. World updates: Italy on Sunday reported 756 new deaths, bringing its total 10,779. Spain reported almost 840 dead, another new daily record that bring its total to over 6,500.
  7. What should I do? Answers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingQ&A: Minimizing your coronavirus risk
  8. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it.

Subscribe to Mike Allen's Axios AM to follow our coronavirus coverage each morning from your inbox.