Jan 19, 2019

1. How Gen Z could change the GOP

Data: Pew Research Center; Note: Survey of U.S. adults aged 18+ conducted Sept. 24–Oct. 7, 2018. Teens aged 13–17 conducted Sept. 17–Nov. 25, 2018; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Generation Z is following in Millennials' footprints in many ways, but the 13- to 21-year-old Republicans of today could force the GOP to move to the left on some issues if they keep the same views as they get older.

Why it matters: A suspicion of big government has been a defining theme of the Republican Party for decades, but a Pew Research Center survey found that more than half of the next generation of Republicans is open to using government action to solve problems. They're also the most likely generation to embrace racial diversity.

By the numbers:

  • Gen Z is the only generation in which a majority of self-identified Republicans says government should be more active in solving problems.
  • More than half of Gen Z Republicans said increased racial and ethnic diversity is good for society. That's a theme that the current GOP has struggled with, but a more diverse party will be critical to its survival, as almost half of the post-Millennial generation is non-white.
  • 38% said they believe climate change is caused by human activity, compared to less than one-third of Millennial Republicans.
  • 43% said that African-Americans are treated less fairly than whites in the U.S., a jump of 13 percentage points from the previous generation.
  • Yet 60% still approved of Trump's job as president.

The big picture: Most of Generation Z isn't even old enough to vote, and their political views could change as they get older. But this generation has already been marked by significant political activism.

  • The Parkland high school students launched an influential gun control campaign.
  • 6 teens ran for governor in Kansas.
  • There were efforts to lower the voting age to 16 in D.C. last year.
  • And young voter turnout in the midterms surged in many states.

The bottom line: Maybe the era of big government isn't over after all.

Go deeper

Exclusive: Global trust in the tech industry is slipping

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The backlash against Big Tech has long flourished among pundits and policymakers, but a new survey suggests it's beginning to show up in popular opinion as well.

Driving the news: New data from Edelman out Tuesday finds that trust in tech companies is declining and that people trust cutting-edge technologies like artificial intelligence less than they do the industry overall.

"It was 30 years ago, get over it": Mike Bloomberg's partner brushes off NDA concerns

Diana Taylor at a Mike Bloomberg event last month. Photo: Ron Adar/Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Diana Taylor, Mike Bloomberg's longtime partner, dismissed the concerns surrounding non-disclosure agreements used at his company, Bloomberg LP, telling CBS News that she would say to those bothered by the allegations, "It was 30 years ago, get over it."

Why it matters: Democratic candidates have used the NDAs as a talking point against Bloomberg, calling on him to allow women to speak about the reported sexual harassment and gender discrimination they faced while working for him.

Trump's opportunity to use Bernie as an economic scapegoat

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photos: Zach Gibson/Stringer, The Washington Post/Getty Contributor

Bernie Sanders is poised to become an economic scapegoat for both the White House and Corporate America, assuming that Sanders comes through Super Tuesday unscathed.

The big picture: If the U.S. economy remains strong, President Trump and CEOs will claim credit (as they've been doing for three years). If it turns sour, they'll blame Bernie (even though it's a largely baseless charge).